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Emotional Empathy and Facial Mimicry for Static and Dynamic Facial Expressions of Fear and Disgust

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ABSTRACT

Facial mimicry is the tendency to imitate the emotional facial expressions of others. Increasing evidence suggests that the perception of dynamic displays leads to enhanced facial mimicry, especially for happiness and anger. However, little is known about the impact of dynamic stimuli on facial mimicry for fear and disgust. To investigate this issue, facial EMG responses were recorded in the corrugator supercilii, levator labii, and lateral frontalis muscles, while participants viewed static (photos) and dynamic (videos) facial emotional expressions. Moreover, we tested whether emotional empathy modulated facial mimicry for emotional facial expressions. In accordance with our predictions, the highly empathic group responded with larger activity in the corrugator supercilii and levator labii muscles. Moreover, dynamic compared to static facial expressions of fear revealed enhanced mimicry in the high-empathic group in the frontalis and corrugator supercilii muscles. In the low-empathic group the facial reactions were not differentiated between fear and disgust for both dynamic and static facial expressions. We conclude that highly empathic subjects are more sensitive in their facial reactions to the facial expressions of fear and disgust compared to low empathetic counterparts. Our data confirms that personal characteristics, i.e., empathy traits as well as modality of the presented stimuli, modulate the strength of facial mimicry. In addition, measures of EMG activity of the levator labii and frontalis muscles may be a useful index of empathic responses of fear and disgust.

No MeSH data available.


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Mean (±SE) EMG activity changes and corresponding statistics for lateral frontalis during presentation conditions moderated by empathy groups. Asterisks with lines beneath indicate significant differences between conditions (simple effects) in EMG responses: +p < 0.1, ∗p < 0.05. Asterisks followed “b” indicate significant differences from baseline EMG responses: b+p < 0.1, b∗p < 0.05.
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Figure 3: Mean (±SE) EMG activity changes and corresponding statistics for lateral frontalis during presentation conditions moderated by empathy groups. Asterisks with lines beneath indicate significant differences between conditions (simple effects) in EMG responses: +p < 0.1, ∗p < 0.05. Asterisks followed “b” indicate significant differences from baseline EMG responses: b+p < 0.1, b∗p < 0.05.

Mentions: Main effect of emotion showed that subjects reacted to fear compared to disgust with stronger LF activity. Emotional empathy groups × emotion interaction showed: (1) higher LF reaction in HE group to fear than disgust facial expressions; (2) HE compared to LE subjects reacted to fear expressions with higher LF activity. Emotional empathy groups × modality interaction indicated that higher LF reaction in HE group to dynamic than static facial expressions. Interaction of emotional empathy groups × emotion × modality showed (see Figure 3, for statistics see Table 4; Supplementary Table S3): (1) HE compared with LE people reacted with stronger LF response for dynamic fear; (2) HE subjects reacted with stronger LF response for dynamic fear compared to dynamic disgust and with stronger LF activity for static fear compared to static disgust (trend effect); (3) HE subjects reacted with higher EMG activity for dynamic than static fear expressions.


Emotional Empathy and Facial Mimicry for Static and Dynamic Facial Expressions of Fear and Disgust
Mean (±SE) EMG activity changes and corresponding statistics for lateral frontalis during presentation conditions moderated by empathy groups. Asterisks with lines beneath indicate significant differences between conditions (simple effects) in EMG responses: +p < 0.1, ∗p < 0.05. Asterisks followed “b” indicate significant differences from baseline EMG responses: b+p < 0.1, b∗p < 0.05.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120108&req=5

Figure 3: Mean (±SE) EMG activity changes and corresponding statistics for lateral frontalis during presentation conditions moderated by empathy groups. Asterisks with lines beneath indicate significant differences between conditions (simple effects) in EMG responses: +p < 0.1, ∗p < 0.05. Asterisks followed “b” indicate significant differences from baseline EMG responses: b+p < 0.1, b∗p < 0.05.
Mentions: Main effect of emotion showed that subjects reacted to fear compared to disgust with stronger LF activity. Emotional empathy groups × emotion interaction showed: (1) higher LF reaction in HE group to fear than disgust facial expressions; (2) HE compared to LE subjects reacted to fear expressions with higher LF activity. Emotional empathy groups × modality interaction indicated that higher LF reaction in HE group to dynamic than static facial expressions. Interaction of emotional empathy groups × emotion × modality showed (see Figure 3, for statistics see Table 4; Supplementary Table S3): (1) HE compared with LE people reacted with stronger LF response for dynamic fear; (2) HE subjects reacted with stronger LF response for dynamic fear compared to dynamic disgust and with stronger LF activity for static fear compared to static disgust (trend effect); (3) HE subjects reacted with higher EMG activity for dynamic than static fear expressions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Facial mimicry is the tendency to imitate the emotional facial expressions of others. Increasing evidence suggests that the perception of dynamic displays leads to enhanced facial mimicry, especially for happiness and anger. However, little is known about the impact of dynamic stimuli on facial mimicry for fear and disgust. To investigate this issue, facial EMG responses were recorded in the corrugator supercilii, levator labii, and lateral frontalis muscles, while participants viewed static (photos) and dynamic (videos) facial emotional expressions. Moreover, we tested whether emotional empathy modulated facial mimicry for emotional facial expressions. In accordance with our predictions, the highly empathic group responded with larger activity in the corrugator supercilii and levator labii muscles. Moreover, dynamic compared to static facial expressions of fear revealed enhanced mimicry in the high-empathic group in the frontalis and corrugator supercilii muscles. In the low-empathic group the facial reactions were not differentiated between fear and disgust for both dynamic and static facial expressions. We conclude that highly empathic subjects are more sensitive in their facial reactions to the facial expressions of fear and disgust compared to low empathetic counterparts. Our data confirms that personal characteristics, i.e., empathy traits as well as modality of the presented stimuli, modulate the strength of facial mimicry. In addition, measures of EMG activity of the levator labii and frontalis muscles may be a useful index of empathic responses of fear and disgust.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus