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Production, Characterization, and Application of Bacillus licheniformis W16 Biosurfactant in Enhancing Oil Recovery

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ABSTRACT

The biosurfactant production by Bacillus licheniformis W16 and evaluation of biosurfactant based enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using core-flood under reservoir conditions were investigated. Previously reported nine different production media were screened for biosurfactant production, and two were further optimized with different carbon sources (glucose, sucrose, starch, cane molasses, or date molasses), as well as the strain was screened for biosurfactant production during the growth in different media. The biosurfactant reduced the surface tension and interfacial tension to 24.33 ± 0.57 mN m−1 and 2.47 ± 0.32 mN m−1 respectively within 72 h, at 40°C, and also altered the wettability of a hydrophobic surface by changing the contact angle from 55.67 ± 1.6 to 19.54°± 0.96°. The critical micelle dilution values of 4X were observed. The biosurfactants were characterized by different analytical techniques and identified as lipopeptide, similar to lichenysin-A. The biosurfactant was stable over wide range of extreme environmental conditions. The core flood experiments showed that the biosurfactant was able to enhance the oil recovery by 24–26% over residual oil saturation (Sor). The results highlight the potential application of lipopeptide biosurfactant in wettability alteration and microbial EOR processes.

No MeSH data available.


The cumulative oil recovery (light oil – API 36.51°) from Berea sandstone core-plugs using biosurfactant.
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Figure 8: The cumulative oil recovery (light oil – API 36.51°) from Berea sandstone core-plugs using biosurfactant.

Mentions: For core-flood experiments, cell-free biosurfactant broth was used. The pore volumes of the core-plugs were 17–19 cm3. Initial oil saturation (Soi) in cores after oil flooding was around 73–77%, and after 7 PV of brine injection, nearly 80–85% (≅11.5 ml) of oil was produced and residual oil saturation (Sor) was about 15–20%. Extra oil recovery was observed after injecting 4–5 PV of biosurfactant solution, where 24–26% (≅0.5 ml) of Sor was produced (Figure 8). Other researchers have reported 20–37% additional oil recovery over the residual oil saturation using cell-free biosurfactant injection in the core-plugs or sand-pack columns (Yakimov et al., 1997; Almeida et al., 2004; Al-Sulaimani et al., 2011a; Darvishi et al., 2011; Joshi and Desai, 2013; Al-Wahaibi et al., 2014; Arora et al., 2014; Elshafie et al., 2015; Joshi et al., 2015; Jha et al., 2016). In present study, the additional oil recovered could be due to mechanisms like reduction in ST/IFT and/or due to wettability alteration at the rock-oil-water interface, as observed during the course of study.


Production, Characterization, and Application of Bacillus licheniformis W16 Biosurfactant in Enhancing Oil Recovery
The cumulative oil recovery (light oil – API 36.51°) from Berea sandstone core-plugs using biosurfactant.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120096&req=5

Figure 8: The cumulative oil recovery (light oil – API 36.51°) from Berea sandstone core-plugs using biosurfactant.
Mentions: For core-flood experiments, cell-free biosurfactant broth was used. The pore volumes of the core-plugs were 17–19 cm3. Initial oil saturation (Soi) in cores after oil flooding was around 73–77%, and after 7 PV of brine injection, nearly 80–85% (≅11.5 ml) of oil was produced and residual oil saturation (Sor) was about 15–20%. Extra oil recovery was observed after injecting 4–5 PV of biosurfactant solution, where 24–26% (≅0.5 ml) of Sor was produced (Figure 8). Other researchers have reported 20–37% additional oil recovery over the residual oil saturation using cell-free biosurfactant injection in the core-plugs or sand-pack columns (Yakimov et al., 1997; Almeida et al., 2004; Al-Sulaimani et al., 2011a; Darvishi et al., 2011; Joshi and Desai, 2013; Al-Wahaibi et al., 2014; Arora et al., 2014; Elshafie et al., 2015; Joshi et al., 2015; Jha et al., 2016). In present study, the additional oil recovered could be due to mechanisms like reduction in ST/IFT and/or due to wettability alteration at the rock-oil-water interface, as observed during the course of study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The biosurfactant production by Bacillus licheniformis W16 and evaluation of biosurfactant based enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using core-flood under reservoir conditions were investigated. Previously reported nine different production media were screened for biosurfactant production, and two were further optimized with different carbon sources (glucose, sucrose, starch, cane molasses, or date molasses), as well as the strain was screened for biosurfactant production during the growth in different media. The biosurfactant reduced the surface tension and interfacial tension to 24.33 ± 0.57 mN m−1 and 2.47 ± 0.32 mN m−1 respectively within 72 h, at 40°C, and also altered the wettability of a hydrophobic surface by changing the contact angle from 55.67 ± 1.6 to 19.54°± 0.96°. The critical micelle dilution values of 4X were observed. The biosurfactants were characterized by different analytical techniques and identified as lipopeptide, similar to lichenysin-A. The biosurfactant was stable over wide range of extreme environmental conditions. The core flood experiments showed that the biosurfactant was able to enhance the oil recovery by 24–26% over residual oil saturation (Sor). The results highlight the potential application of lipopeptide biosurfactant in wettability alteration and microbial EOR processes.

No MeSH data available.