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Differences in clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes in antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia: Are these the same disorder?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: New-onset postpartum preeclampsia is a poorly defined condition that accounts for a significant percentage of eclampsia cases. It is unclear whether new-onset postpartum preeclampsia is a different disorder from or belongs to the same spectrum of classic antepartum preeclampsia. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes of antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia.

Methods: A retrospective study including 92 patients with antepartum preeclampsia and 92 patients with new-onset postpartum preeclampsia was performed. Clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes were compared. Chi-square test was used to analyze categorical variables, and independent t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test for numerical variables. P-values of <0.05 were used to indicate statistical signifi cance.

Results: Patients with antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia differ significantly in profile, symptoms at presentation, laboratory markers and pregnancy outcomes.

Conclusion: New-onset postpartum preeclampsia has a distinct patient profile and clinical presentation than antepartum preeclampsia, suggesting they may represent different disorders. Characterization of a patient profile with increased risk of developing this condition will help clinicians to identify patients at risk and provide early and targeted interventions to decrease the morbidity associated with this condition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Laboratory markers in cases with antepartum and postpartum preeclampsia (n=184). (A) Biochemical markers and (B) hematologic markers. Significant biochemical and hematologic early in pregnancy and at presentation in cases with antepartum preeclampsia and postpartum preeclampsia. Antepartum preeclampsia in black continuous lines, postpartum preeclampsia in black dashed lines. The dots represents the means, the horizontal lines the trend along pregnancy duration, and the vertical lines the confidence intervals of the means. Changes along pregnancy seem to be more evident in postpartum preeclampsia.
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Figure 2: Laboratory markers in cases with antepartum and postpartum preeclampsia (n=184). (A) Biochemical markers and (B) hematologic markers. Significant biochemical and hematologic early in pregnancy and at presentation in cases with antepartum preeclampsia and postpartum preeclampsia. Antepartum preeclampsia in black continuous lines, postpartum preeclampsia in black dashed lines. The dots represents the means, the horizontal lines the trend along pregnancy duration, and the vertical lines the confidence intervals of the means. Changes along pregnancy seem to be more evident in postpartum preeclampsia.

Mentions: Laboratory markers are shown in Table 2 and Fig. 2. At first visit, there was only statistical difference in the means of platelet volume levels between antepartum and postpartum preeclampsia (10.8 vs. 10.3, t(116)=2.183, P=0.031); there was no statistical difference in the other laboratory markers during the first visit. At presentation, there was statistical difference in the means of serum creatinine (0.7 vs. 0.8, t(163)=-2.009, P=0.046); aspartate aminotransferase (29.2 vs. 75.7, t(177)=-3.412, P=0.001); lactate dehydrogenase (203.5 vs. 338.1, t(35)=-3.071, P=0.004); hemoglobin (11.3 vs. 10.7, t(182)=2.748, P=0.007); platelet count (239.7 vs. 308.4, t(182)=-5.743, P<0.001); and MPV (11.3 vs. 9.8, t(178)=7.839, P<0.001). There was no statistical difference in the mean corpuscular volume. As shown in Fig. 2, the overall variation of the laboratory markers analyzed along pregnancy seem to be more evident in the postpartum preeclampsia group.


Differences in clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes in antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia: Are these the same disorder?
Laboratory markers in cases with antepartum and postpartum preeclampsia (n=184). (A) Biochemical markers and (B) hematologic markers. Significant biochemical and hematologic early in pregnancy and at presentation in cases with antepartum preeclampsia and postpartum preeclampsia. Antepartum preeclampsia in black continuous lines, postpartum preeclampsia in black dashed lines. The dots represents the means, the horizontal lines the trend along pregnancy duration, and the vertical lines the confidence intervals of the means. Changes along pregnancy seem to be more evident in postpartum preeclampsia.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120062&req=5

Figure 2: Laboratory markers in cases with antepartum and postpartum preeclampsia (n=184). (A) Biochemical markers and (B) hematologic markers. Significant biochemical and hematologic early in pregnancy and at presentation in cases with antepartum preeclampsia and postpartum preeclampsia. Antepartum preeclampsia in black continuous lines, postpartum preeclampsia in black dashed lines. The dots represents the means, the horizontal lines the trend along pregnancy duration, and the vertical lines the confidence intervals of the means. Changes along pregnancy seem to be more evident in postpartum preeclampsia.
Mentions: Laboratory markers are shown in Table 2 and Fig. 2. At first visit, there was only statistical difference in the means of platelet volume levels between antepartum and postpartum preeclampsia (10.8 vs. 10.3, t(116)=2.183, P=0.031); there was no statistical difference in the other laboratory markers during the first visit. At presentation, there was statistical difference in the means of serum creatinine (0.7 vs. 0.8, t(163)=-2.009, P=0.046); aspartate aminotransferase (29.2 vs. 75.7, t(177)=-3.412, P=0.001); lactate dehydrogenase (203.5 vs. 338.1, t(35)=-3.071, P=0.004); hemoglobin (11.3 vs. 10.7, t(182)=2.748, P=0.007); platelet count (239.7 vs. 308.4, t(182)=-5.743, P<0.001); and MPV (11.3 vs. 9.8, t(178)=7.839, P<0.001). There was no statistical difference in the mean corpuscular volume. As shown in Fig. 2, the overall variation of the laboratory markers analyzed along pregnancy seem to be more evident in the postpartum preeclampsia group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: New-onset postpartum preeclampsia is a poorly defined condition that accounts for a significant percentage of eclampsia cases. It is unclear whether new-onset postpartum preeclampsia is a different disorder from or belongs to the same spectrum of classic antepartum preeclampsia. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes of antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia.

Methods: A retrospective study including 92 patients with antepartum preeclampsia and 92 patients with new-onset postpartum preeclampsia was performed. Clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes were compared. Chi-square test was used to analyze categorical variables, and independent t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test for numerical variables. P-values of &lt;0.05 were used to indicate statistical signifi cance.

Results: Patients with antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia differ significantly in profile, symptoms at presentation, laboratory markers and pregnancy outcomes.

Conclusion: New-onset postpartum preeclampsia has a distinct patient profile and clinical presentation than antepartum preeclampsia, suggesting they may represent different disorders. Characterization of a patient profile with increased risk of developing this condition will help clinicians to identify patients at risk and provide early and targeted interventions to decrease the morbidity associated with this condition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus