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Differences in clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes in antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia: Are these the same disorder?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: New-onset postpartum preeclampsia is a poorly defined condition that accounts for a significant percentage of eclampsia cases. It is unclear whether new-onset postpartum preeclampsia is a different disorder from or belongs to the same spectrum of classic antepartum preeclampsia. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes of antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia.

Methods: A retrospective study including 92 patients with antepartum preeclampsia and 92 patients with new-onset postpartum preeclampsia was performed. Clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes were compared. Chi-square test was used to analyze categorical variables, and independent t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test for numerical variables. P-values of <0.05 were used to indicate statistical signifi cance.

Results: Patients with antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia differ significantly in profile, symptoms at presentation, laboratory markers and pregnancy outcomes.

Conclusion: New-onset postpartum preeclampsia has a distinct patient profile and clinical presentation than antepartum preeclampsia, suggesting they may represent different disorders. Characterization of a patient profile with increased risk of developing this condition will help clinicians to identify patients at risk and provide early and targeted interventions to decrease the morbidity associated with this condition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fluxogram for selection of cases with antepartum and postpartum preeclampsia (n=1,059). Selection of cases with antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia matched by gestational age and body mass index. The propensity score matching model resulted in 184 matched cases, with 92 in each group.
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Figure 1: Fluxogram for selection of cases with antepartum and postpartum preeclampsia (n=1,059). Selection of cases with antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia matched by gestational age and body mass index. The propensity score matching model resulted in 184 matched cases, with 92 in each group.

Mentions: After applying inclusion/exclusion criteria, the model provided a total of 184 cases that were considered for analysis: 92 cases with antepartum preeclampsia (21.7% mild preeclampsia and 78.3 severe preeclampsia), and 92 with new-onset postpartum preeclampsia (Fig. 1).


Differences in clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes in antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia: Are these the same disorder?
Fluxogram for selection of cases with antepartum and postpartum preeclampsia (n=1,059). Selection of cases with antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia matched by gestational age and body mass index. The propensity score matching model resulted in 184 matched cases, with 92 in each group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120062&req=5

Figure 1: Fluxogram for selection of cases with antepartum and postpartum preeclampsia (n=1,059). Selection of cases with antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia matched by gestational age and body mass index. The propensity score matching model resulted in 184 matched cases, with 92 in each group.
Mentions: After applying inclusion/exclusion criteria, the model provided a total of 184 cases that were considered for analysis: 92 cases with antepartum preeclampsia (21.7% mild preeclampsia and 78.3 severe preeclampsia), and 92 with new-onset postpartum preeclampsia (Fig. 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objective: New-onset postpartum preeclampsia is a poorly defined condition that accounts for a significant percentage of eclampsia cases. It is unclear whether new-onset postpartum preeclampsia is a different disorder from or belongs to the same spectrum of classic antepartum preeclampsia. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes of antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia.

Methods: A retrospective study including 92 patients with antepartum preeclampsia and 92 patients with new-onset postpartum preeclampsia was performed. Clinical presentation and pregnancy outcomes were compared. Chi-square test was used to analyze categorical variables, and independent t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test for numerical variables. P-values of <0.05 were used to indicate statistical signifi cance.

Results: Patients with antepartum preeclampsia and new-onset postpartum preeclampsia differ significantly in profile, symptoms at presentation, laboratory markers and pregnancy outcomes.

Conclusion: New-onset postpartum preeclampsia has a distinct patient profile and clinical presentation than antepartum preeclampsia, suggesting they may represent different disorders. Characterization of a patient profile with increased risk of developing this condition will help clinicians to identify patients at risk and provide early and targeted interventions to decrease the morbidity associated with this condition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus