Limits...
What ’ s counted as a reindeer herder? Gender and the adaptive capacity of Sami reindeer herding communities in Sweden

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Researchers of adaptive capacity and sustainable livelihoods have frequently used social, cultural, human, economic and institutional capitals to better understand how rural and resource-dependent communities address environmental, social and economic stresses. Yet few studies have considered how men and women contribute differently to these capitals to support community resilience overall. Our research sought to understand the differential contributions of Sami men and women to the adaptive capacity of reindeer husbandry and reindeer herding communities in northern Sweden. Our focus revealed a gendered division of labour in reindeer herding as an economic enterprise as well as gendered contributions to a broader conceptualization of reindeer husbandry as a family and community-based practice, and as a livelihood and cultural tradition. Based on our results, we recommend that community resilience be enhanced by generating more opportunities for men to achieve higher levels of human and economic capital (particularly outside of herding activities) and encouraging women to contribute more directly to institutional capital by participating in the formation and implementation of legislation, policies and plans.

No MeSH data available.


Reindeer herding corral in the study area (Photographer: Maureen Reed)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120026&req=5

Fig2: Reindeer herding corral in the study area (Photographer: Maureen Reed)

Mentions: Adato and Meinzen-Dick (2002) suggest a mix of quantitative and qualitative data is necessary to understand livelihoods, specifically pointing to the value of combining results from household surveys, interviews, focus groups and secondary sources. All of these sources were used in this study. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by the first author using a questionnaire survey of reindeer herding communities in Sweden involved in herding plans. There are 51 reindeer herding communities in Sweden; all were invited to participate in the study and 34 agreed (Fig. 2). Questionnaires (in Swedish) were mailed to 270 households. Eighty-one questionnaires were returned from 63 households, for a household response rate of 23.3 %. Of respondents, 59 were men and 22 were women.Fig. 2


What ’ s counted as a reindeer herder? Gender and the adaptive capacity of Sami reindeer herding communities in Sweden
Reindeer herding corral in the study area (Photographer: Maureen Reed)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120026&req=5

Fig2: Reindeer herding corral in the study area (Photographer: Maureen Reed)
Mentions: Adato and Meinzen-Dick (2002) suggest a mix of quantitative and qualitative data is necessary to understand livelihoods, specifically pointing to the value of combining results from household surveys, interviews, focus groups and secondary sources. All of these sources were used in this study. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected by the first author using a questionnaire survey of reindeer herding communities in Sweden involved in herding plans. There are 51 reindeer herding communities in Sweden; all were invited to participate in the study and 34 agreed (Fig. 2). Questionnaires (in Swedish) were mailed to 270 households. Eighty-one questionnaires were returned from 63 households, for a household response rate of 23.3 %. Of respondents, 59 were men and 22 were women.Fig. 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Researchers of adaptive capacity and sustainable livelihoods have frequently used social, cultural, human, economic and institutional capitals to better understand how rural and resource-dependent communities address environmental, social and economic stresses. Yet few studies have considered how men and women contribute differently to these capitals to support community resilience overall. Our research sought to understand the differential contributions of Sami men and women to the adaptive capacity of reindeer husbandry and reindeer herding communities in northern Sweden. Our focus revealed a gendered division of labour in reindeer herding as an economic enterprise as well as gendered contributions to a broader conceptualization of reindeer husbandry as a family and community-based practice, and as a livelihood and cultural tradition. Based on our results, we recommend that community resilience be enhanced by generating more opportunities for men to achieve higher levels of human and economic capital (particularly outside of herding activities) and encouraging women to contribute more directly to institutional capital by participating in the formation and implementation of legislation, policies and plans.

No MeSH data available.