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Gendered vulnerabilities and grassroots adaptation initiatives in home gardens and small orchards in Northwest Mexico

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ABSTRACT

With the retreat of the state under neoliberalism, the lack of (or negligible) government and non-governmental support reasserts grassroots initiatives as a global-change strategy. A feminist political ecology approach and the concept of adverse inclusion were used to facilitate an analysis of social differences shaping local-level adaptive responses. Adaptive responses of small farmers in the border village of San Ignacio, Sonora, Mexico, who are increasingly vulnerable to climate change, water scarcity, and changing labor markets were studied. Gender differences in production sites translate into diverse vulnerabilities and adaptive strategies. Local capacities and initiatives should be a focus of research and policy to avoid viewing women and men as passive in the face of global change. The dynamic strategies of San Ignacio women and men in home gardens and small orchards hold lessons for other regions particularly related to adaptation to climate change via agrobiodiversity, water resource management, and diversified agricultural livelihoods.

No MeSH data available.


Citrus trees in home garden irrigated with greywater from washing machine. Photo credit: Stephanie Buechler
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Fig3: Citrus trees in home garden irrigated with greywater from washing machine. Photo credit: Stephanie Buechler

Mentions: In another home garden, the household’s women irrigate tree and other crops with tap water and greywater from their laundry machine and kitchen sink in order to stretch scarce water resources (Fig. 3). Angela, a woman residing there full-time, used to sell roses and other flowers from her home compound, but these too froze in January 2013. She is not able to sell many anymore; with the lingering recession that was still affecting employment in early 2016, there was not enough cash in circulation in San Ignacio or Magdalena for most to afford such luxuries. She thus gives some flowers away to friends and neighbors and supplies the church with flowers. Angela now sells citrus flowers she collects from lemon, grapefruit, and orange trees in her home compound. She dries these citrus flowers and sells each type separately as medicinal teas. Work related to medicinal products is conducted only by women in home gardens and can be viewed as an extension of their labor as caregivers to family members.Fig. 3


Gendered vulnerabilities and grassroots adaptation initiatives in home gardens and small orchards in Northwest Mexico
Citrus trees in home garden irrigated with greywater from washing machine. Photo credit: Stephanie Buechler
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120024&req=5

Fig3: Citrus trees in home garden irrigated with greywater from washing machine. Photo credit: Stephanie Buechler
Mentions: In another home garden, the household’s women irrigate tree and other crops with tap water and greywater from their laundry machine and kitchen sink in order to stretch scarce water resources (Fig. 3). Angela, a woman residing there full-time, used to sell roses and other flowers from her home compound, but these too froze in January 2013. She is not able to sell many anymore; with the lingering recession that was still affecting employment in early 2016, there was not enough cash in circulation in San Ignacio or Magdalena for most to afford such luxuries. She thus gives some flowers away to friends and neighbors and supplies the church with flowers. Angela now sells citrus flowers she collects from lemon, grapefruit, and orange trees in her home compound. She dries these citrus flowers and sells each type separately as medicinal teas. Work related to medicinal products is conducted only by women in home gardens and can be viewed as an extension of their labor as caregivers to family members.Fig. 3

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

With the retreat of the state under neoliberalism, the lack of (or negligible) government and non-governmental support reasserts grassroots initiatives as a global-change strategy. A feminist political ecology approach and the concept of adverse inclusion were used to facilitate an analysis of social differences shaping local-level adaptive responses. Adaptive responses of small farmers in the border village of San Ignacio, Sonora, Mexico, who are increasingly vulnerable to climate change, water scarcity, and changing labor markets were studied. Gender differences in production sites translate into diverse vulnerabilities and adaptive strategies. Local capacities and initiatives should be a focus of research and policy to avoid viewing women and men as passive in the face of global change. The dynamic strategies of San Ignacio women and men in home gardens and small orchards hold lessons for other regions particularly related to adaptation to climate change via agrobiodiversity, water resource management, and diversified agricultural livelihoods.

No MeSH data available.