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Gendered vulnerabilities and grassroots adaptation initiatives in home gardens and small orchards in Northwest Mexico

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ABSTRACT

With the retreat of the state under neoliberalism, the lack of (or negligible) government and non-governmental support reasserts grassroots initiatives as a global-change strategy. A feminist political ecology approach and the concept of adverse inclusion were used to facilitate an analysis of social differences shaping local-level adaptive responses. Adaptive responses of small farmers in the border village of San Ignacio, Sonora, Mexico, who are increasingly vulnerable to climate change, water scarcity, and changing labor markets were studied. Gender differences in production sites translate into diverse vulnerabilities and adaptive strategies. Local capacities and initiatives should be a focus of research and policy to avoid viewing women and men as passive in the face of global change. The dynamic strategies of San Ignacio women and men in home gardens and small orchards hold lessons for other regions particularly related to adaptation to climate change via agrobiodiversity, water resource management, and diversified agricultural livelihoods.

No MeSH data available.


Home gardener selling her pickled vegetables from her house. Photo credit: Stephanie Buechler
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Fig2: Home gardener selling her pickled vegetables from her house. Photo credit: Stephanie Buechler

Mentions: In addition to small-scale agriculture, the home compound in San Ignacio serves as the main location for food processing-related work; crops are converted into quince paste and jam, fig jam, canned quince, peaches and pears, candied lemons and fruit popsicles as well as lye-cured and salted olives, olive oil, and pickled vegetables (Fig. 2). Skills related to processing are passed down from generation to generation. Mainly women are involved in the processing stages in the activities with the exception of quince paste where men are involved in the beginning stages of grinding the quince and cooking large copper vats of ground quince over a fire or gas burners.Fig. 2


Gendered vulnerabilities and grassroots adaptation initiatives in home gardens and small orchards in Northwest Mexico
Home gardener selling her pickled vegetables from her house. Photo credit: Stephanie Buechler
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120024&req=5

Fig2: Home gardener selling her pickled vegetables from her house. Photo credit: Stephanie Buechler
Mentions: In addition to small-scale agriculture, the home compound in San Ignacio serves as the main location for food processing-related work; crops are converted into quince paste and jam, fig jam, canned quince, peaches and pears, candied lemons and fruit popsicles as well as lye-cured and salted olives, olive oil, and pickled vegetables (Fig. 2). Skills related to processing are passed down from generation to generation. Mainly women are involved in the processing stages in the activities with the exception of quince paste where men are involved in the beginning stages of grinding the quince and cooking large copper vats of ground quince over a fire or gas burners.Fig. 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

With the retreat of the state under neoliberalism, the lack of (or negligible) government and non-governmental support reasserts grassroots initiatives as a global-change strategy. A feminist political ecology approach and the concept of adverse inclusion were used to facilitate an analysis of social differences shaping local-level adaptive responses. Adaptive responses of small farmers in the border village of San Ignacio, Sonora, Mexico, who are increasingly vulnerable to climate change, water scarcity, and changing labor markets were studied. Gender differences in production sites translate into diverse vulnerabilities and adaptive strategies. Local capacities and initiatives should be a focus of research and policy to avoid viewing women and men as passive in the face of global change. The dynamic strategies of San Ignacio women and men in home gardens and small orchards hold lessons for other regions particularly related to adaptation to climate change via agrobiodiversity, water resource management, and diversified agricultural livelihoods.

No MeSH data available.