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Gendered knowledge and adaptive practices: Differentiation and change in Mwanga District, Tanzania

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ABSTRACT

We examine the wider social knowledge domain that complements technical and environmental knowledge in enabling adaptive practices through two case studies in Tanzania. We are concerned with knowledge production that is shaped by gendered exclusion from the main thrusts of planned adaptation, in the practice of irrigation in a dryland village and the adoption of fast-maturing seed varieties in a highland village. The findings draw on data from a household survey, community workshops, and key informant interviews. The largest challenge to effective adaptation is a lack of access to the social networks and institutions that allocate resources needed for adaptation. Results demonstrate the social differentiation of local knowledge, and how it is entwined with adaptive practices that emerge in relation to gendered mechanisms of access. We conclude that community-based adaptation can learn from engaging the broader social knowledge base in evaluating priorities for coping with greater climate variability.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s13280-016-0828-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


The typical landscape of Kirya Village: A semiarid lowland area in Mwanga District. The photo shows River Pangani (Ruvu) in the foreground (photo by E. E. Wangui)
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Fig1: The typical landscape of Kirya Village: A semiarid lowland area in Mwanga District. The photo shows River Pangani (Ruvu) in the foreground (photo by E. E. Wangui)

Mentions: Mwanga District lies in the Kilimanjaro Region of northern Tanzania. According to The Mwanga District Socioeconomic Profile, the total population of the district was estimated at 142 990 in 2012, spread across 70 villages (URT 2011). The results presented here are from two villages that fall in different ecological and livelihood zones within the district. Kirya Village is in the semiarid lowlands where the main livelihood activity has historically been pastoralism. Mangio Village lies in the humid and sub-humid highlands where farmers rely on a mix of intensive rain-fed and irrigated agriculture made possible by an extensive hill furrow irrigation system. Figures 1 and 2 show the typical landscapes in each of the two villages. A focus on these two diverse landscapes allows us to examine the local knowledge dimensions of adaptive practices in two distinct ecological and livelihood contexts.Fig. 1


Gendered knowledge and adaptive practices: Differentiation and change in Mwanga District, Tanzania
The typical landscape of Kirya Village: A semiarid lowland area in Mwanga District. The photo shows River Pangani (Ruvu) in the foreground (photo by E. E. Wangui)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120021&req=5

Fig1: The typical landscape of Kirya Village: A semiarid lowland area in Mwanga District. The photo shows River Pangani (Ruvu) in the foreground (photo by E. E. Wangui)
Mentions: Mwanga District lies in the Kilimanjaro Region of northern Tanzania. According to The Mwanga District Socioeconomic Profile, the total population of the district was estimated at 142 990 in 2012, spread across 70 villages (URT 2011). The results presented here are from two villages that fall in different ecological and livelihood zones within the district. Kirya Village is in the semiarid lowlands where the main livelihood activity has historically been pastoralism. Mangio Village lies in the humid and sub-humid highlands where farmers rely on a mix of intensive rain-fed and irrigated agriculture made possible by an extensive hill furrow irrigation system. Figures 1 and 2 show the typical landscapes in each of the two villages. A focus on these two diverse landscapes allows us to examine the local knowledge dimensions of adaptive practices in two distinct ecological and livelihood contexts.Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

We examine the wider social knowledge domain that complements technical and environmental knowledge in enabling adaptive practices through two case studies in Tanzania. We are concerned with knowledge production that is shaped by gendered exclusion from the main thrusts of planned adaptation, in the practice of irrigation in a dryland village and the adoption of fast-maturing seed varieties in a highland village. The findings draw on data from a household survey, community workshops, and key informant interviews. The largest challenge to effective adaptation is a lack of access to the social networks and institutions that allocate resources needed for adaptation. Results demonstrate the social differentiation of local knowledge, and how it is entwined with adaptive practices that emerge in relation to gendered mechanisms of access. We conclude that community-based adaptation can learn from engaging the broader social knowledge base in evaluating priorities for coping with greater climate variability.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s13280-016-0828-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.