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Enhancing and expanding intersectional research for climate change adaptation in agrarian settings

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ABSTRACT

Most current approaches focused on vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation to climate change frame gender and its influence in a manner out-of-step with contemporary academic and international development research. The tendency to rely on analyses of the sex-disaggregated gender categories of ‘men’ and ‘women’ as sole or principal divisions explaining the abilities of different people within a group to adapt to climate change, illustrates this problem. This framing of gender persists in spite of established bodies of knowledge that show how roles and responsibilities that influence a person´s ability to deal with climate-induced and other stressors emerge at the intersection of diverse identity categories, including but not limited to gender, age, seniority, ethnicity, marital status, and livelihoods. Here, we provide a review of relevant literature on this topic and argue that approaching vulnerability to climate change through intersectional understandings of identity can help improve adaptation programming, project design, implementation, and outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Relief Map for a girl living in Manresa, Catalonia, illustrating her lived experience of integrated dimensions of power, space, and oppression/privilege as she moves through different areas of her hometown (Rodó-de-Zárate 2014, p. 929)
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Fig2: Relief Map for a girl living in Manresa, Catalonia, illustrating her lived experience of integrated dimensions of power, space, and oppression/privilege as she moves through different areas of her hometown (Rodó-de-Zárate 2014, p. 929)

Mentions: Recent work that makes use of participatory geographic information systems (PGIS), critical GIS (Harvey et al. 2005), and feminist GIS (Elwood 2008) may offer potentially fruitful areas of exploration for this type of integration. These are a result of increased concern in the 1990s over unequal power relations and access, and privileging of certain masculine epistemologies within spatial information and geographic information systems that can overshadow more marginalized or less powerful perspectives (Aitken and Michel 1995). Examples of such work can be found within literature on planning and governance (McCall 2003) and for mapping the social values of local people with regards to natural resources (Tyrväinen et al. 2007; Bernard et al. 2011; Villamor et al. 2014). Kwan (2002a, b) advanced this work with respect to gender and feminist studies by conceptualizing how critical and participatory GIS could be merged with feminist epistemologies to better integrate quantitative and qualitative data within spatial visualizations, as well as for bringing more comprehensive perspectives to issues of political and social change. Since then, feminist GIS has emerged as a dynamic research line (Sui and DeLyser 2012). This line is inclusive of works such as those focused on impacts of GIS in women’s lives (McLafferty 2005) and gender and agriculture (Harman 2013). We see opportunities for advancing the scope of such integrated and spatially explicit methods that could encompass intersectional understandings within broader scale analyses of farmer vulnerability and of farmer understandings of agroecosystems. This type of work could build not only on so-called ‘relief maps’ that highlights both the traditional use of the word “relief” in mapping, but also the removal of anxiety or pain and which can be used to explore spatial mapping applications of intersectionality (See Fig. 2 for an example from Rodó-de-Zárate 2014). These maps have three dimensions, the social (power) dimension, the geographical dimension, and the psychological dimension and serve to illustrate how space, power, and privilege/oppression are connected.Fig. 2


Enhancing and expanding intersectional research for climate change adaptation in agrarian settings
Relief Map for a girl living in Manresa, Catalonia, illustrating her lived experience of integrated dimensions of power, space, and oppression/privilege as she moves through different areas of her hometown (Rodó-de-Zárate 2014, p. 929)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5120020&req=5

Fig2: Relief Map for a girl living in Manresa, Catalonia, illustrating her lived experience of integrated dimensions of power, space, and oppression/privilege as she moves through different areas of her hometown (Rodó-de-Zárate 2014, p. 929)
Mentions: Recent work that makes use of participatory geographic information systems (PGIS), critical GIS (Harvey et al. 2005), and feminist GIS (Elwood 2008) may offer potentially fruitful areas of exploration for this type of integration. These are a result of increased concern in the 1990s over unequal power relations and access, and privileging of certain masculine epistemologies within spatial information and geographic information systems that can overshadow more marginalized or less powerful perspectives (Aitken and Michel 1995). Examples of such work can be found within literature on planning and governance (McCall 2003) and for mapping the social values of local people with regards to natural resources (Tyrväinen et al. 2007; Bernard et al. 2011; Villamor et al. 2014). Kwan (2002a, b) advanced this work with respect to gender and feminist studies by conceptualizing how critical and participatory GIS could be merged with feminist epistemologies to better integrate quantitative and qualitative data within spatial visualizations, as well as for bringing more comprehensive perspectives to issues of political and social change. Since then, feminist GIS has emerged as a dynamic research line (Sui and DeLyser 2012). This line is inclusive of works such as those focused on impacts of GIS in women’s lives (McLafferty 2005) and gender and agriculture (Harman 2013). We see opportunities for advancing the scope of such integrated and spatially explicit methods that could encompass intersectional understandings within broader scale analyses of farmer vulnerability and of farmer understandings of agroecosystems. This type of work could build not only on so-called ‘relief maps’ that highlights both the traditional use of the word “relief” in mapping, but also the removal of anxiety or pain and which can be used to explore spatial mapping applications of intersectionality (See Fig. 2 for an example from Rodó-de-Zárate 2014). These maps have three dimensions, the social (power) dimension, the geographical dimension, and the psychological dimension and serve to illustrate how space, power, and privilege/oppression are connected.Fig. 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Most current approaches focused on vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation to climate change frame gender and its influence in a manner out-of-step with contemporary academic and international development research. The tendency to rely on analyses of the sex-disaggregated gender categories of ‘men’ and ‘women’ as sole or principal divisions explaining the abilities of different people within a group to adapt to climate change, illustrates this problem. This framing of gender persists in spite of established bodies of knowledge that show how roles and responsibilities that influence a person´s ability to deal with climate-induced and other stressors emerge at the intersection of diverse identity categories, including but not limited to gender, age, seniority, ethnicity, marital status, and livelihoods. Here, we provide a review of relevant literature on this topic and argue that approaching vulnerability to climate change through intersectional understandings of identity can help improve adaptation programming, project design, implementation, and outcomes.

No MeSH data available.