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Pain-related fear and functional recovery in sciatica: results from a 2-year observational study

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the associations between pain-related fear, pain disability, and self-perceived recovery among patients with sciatica and disk herniation followed up for 2 years.

Patients and methods: Pain-related fear was measured by the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity (FABQ-PA) subscale. Disability was measured by the Maine–Seattle Back Questionnaire. At 2 years, patients reported their sciatica/back problem on a global change scale ranging from completely gone to much worse. No specific interventions regarding pain-related fear were provided.

Results: Complete data were obtained for 372 patients. During follow-up, most patients improved. In those who at 2 years were fully recovered (n=66), pain-related fear decreased substantially. In those who did not improve (n=50), pain-related fear remained high. Baseline levels of pain-related fear did not differ significantly between those who were fully recovered and the rest of the cohort. In the total cohort, the correlation coefficients between the 0–2-year change in disability and the changes in the TSK and the FABQ-PA were 0.33 and 0.38, respectively. In the adjusted regression models, the 0–2-year change in pain-related disability explained 15% of the variance in the change in both questionnaires.

Conclusion: Pain-related fear decreased substantially in patients who recovered from sciatica and remained high in those who did not improve. Generally, the TSK and the FABQ-PA yielded similar results. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has assessed pain-related fear in patients who recover from sciatica.

No MeSH data available.


0–2-year change in the FABQ-PA according to change in pain-related disability.Abbreviation: FABQ-PA, Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity.
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f2-jpr-9-925: 0–2-year change in the FABQ-PA according to change in pain-related disability.Abbreviation: FABQ-PA, Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity.

Mentions: The correlation coefficients between the 0–2-year change in disability and the changes in the TSK and the FABQ-PA were 0.33 and 0.38, respectively. Figures 2 and 3 indicates a linear relationship between disability and the two measures of pain-related fear.


Pain-related fear and functional recovery in sciatica: results from a 2-year observational study
0–2-year change in the FABQ-PA according to change in pain-related disability.Abbreviation: FABQ-PA, Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5096769&req=5

f2-jpr-9-925: 0–2-year change in the FABQ-PA according to change in pain-related disability.Abbreviation: FABQ-PA, Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity.
Mentions: The correlation coefficients between the 0–2-year change in disability and the changes in the TSK and the FABQ-PA were 0.33 and 0.38, respectively. Figures 2 and 3 indicates a linear relationship between disability and the two measures of pain-related fear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the associations between pain-related fear, pain disability, and self-perceived recovery among patients with sciatica and disk herniation followed up for 2 years.

Patients and methods: Pain-related fear was measured by the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity (FABQ-PA) subscale. Disability was measured by the Maine–Seattle Back Questionnaire. At 2 years, patients reported their sciatica/back problem on a global change scale ranging from completely gone to much worse. No specific interventions regarding pain-related fear were provided.

Results: Complete data were obtained for 372 patients. During follow-up, most patients improved. In those who at 2 years were fully recovered (n=66), pain-related fear decreased substantially. In those who did not improve (n=50), pain-related fear remained high. Baseline levels of pain-related fear did not differ significantly between those who were fully recovered and the rest of the cohort. In the total cohort, the correlation coefficients between the 0–2-year change in disability and the changes in the TSK and the FABQ-PA were 0.33 and 0.38, respectively. In the adjusted regression models, the 0–2-year change in pain-related disability explained 15% of the variance in the change in both questionnaires.

Conclusion: Pain-related fear decreased substantially in patients who recovered from sciatica and remained high in those who did not improve. Generally, the TSK and the FABQ-PA yielded similar results. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has assessed pain-related fear in patients who recover from sciatica.

No MeSH data available.