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Saponin-Based Nanoemulsification Improves the Antioxidant Properties of Vitamin A and E in AML-12 Cells

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ABSTRACT

Our work aimed to investigate the protective effects of saponin-based nanoemulsions of vitamin A and E against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage in AML-12 cells. Saponin nanoemulsions of vitamin A (SAN) and vitamin E (SEN) were prepared by high-pressure homogenization and characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, and polydispersity index. SEN and SAN protect AML-12 cells against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage more efficiently via scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and reducing DNA damage, protein carbonylation, and lipid peroxidation. These results provide valuable information for the development of nanoemulsion-based delivery systems that would improve the antioxidant properties of vitamin A and E.

No MeSH data available.


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Effect of nanoemulsion on the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) of HepG-2 cells treated with emulsified and non-emulsified samples. SN, empty saponin nanoemulsion; VA, vitamin A; SAN, saponin nanoemulsion of vitamin A; VE, vitamin E; SEN, saponin nanoemulsion of vitamin E. All values are represented as mean ± SEM from three or more independent studies. * p < 0.05.
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ijms-17-01406-f002: Effect of nanoemulsion on the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) of HepG-2 cells treated with emulsified and non-emulsified samples. SN, empty saponin nanoemulsion; VA, vitamin A; SAN, saponin nanoemulsion of vitamin A; VE, vitamin E; SEN, saponin nanoemulsion of vitamin E. All values are represented as mean ± SEM from three or more independent studies. * p < 0.05.

Mentions: In order to quantify and compare the intracellular antioxidant activity of emulsions and non-emulsions, CAA assay was performed using HepG-2 cells. A decrease in cellular fluorescence is directly proportional to the degree of oxidation [32]. Increased fluorescence from DCF-DA oxidation was inhibited by SEN, thus indicating that it had better antioxidant capacity compared with vitamin E (p < 0.05). On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the antioxidant capacity between vitamin A and SAN (p > 0.05). SN had the least antioxidant activity (Figure 2).


Saponin-Based Nanoemulsification Improves the Antioxidant Properties of Vitamin A and E in AML-12 Cells
Effect of nanoemulsion on the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) of HepG-2 cells treated with emulsified and non-emulsified samples. SN, empty saponin nanoemulsion; VA, vitamin A; SAN, saponin nanoemulsion of vitamin A; VE, vitamin E; SEN, saponin nanoemulsion of vitamin E. All values are represented as mean ± SEM from three or more independent studies. * p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037686&req=5

ijms-17-01406-f002: Effect of nanoemulsion on the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) of HepG-2 cells treated with emulsified and non-emulsified samples. SN, empty saponin nanoemulsion; VA, vitamin A; SAN, saponin nanoemulsion of vitamin A; VE, vitamin E; SEN, saponin nanoemulsion of vitamin E. All values are represented as mean ± SEM from three or more independent studies. * p < 0.05.
Mentions: In order to quantify and compare the intracellular antioxidant activity of emulsions and non-emulsions, CAA assay was performed using HepG-2 cells. A decrease in cellular fluorescence is directly proportional to the degree of oxidation [32]. Increased fluorescence from DCF-DA oxidation was inhibited by SEN, thus indicating that it had better antioxidant capacity compared with vitamin E (p < 0.05). On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the antioxidant capacity between vitamin A and SAN (p > 0.05). SN had the least antioxidant activity (Figure 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Our work aimed to investigate the protective effects of saponin-based nanoemulsions of vitamin A and E against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage in AML-12 cells. Saponin nanoemulsions of vitamin A (SAN) and vitamin E (SEN) were prepared by high-pressure homogenization and characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, and polydispersity index. SEN and SAN protect AML-12 cells against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage more efficiently via scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and reducing DNA damage, protein carbonylation, and lipid peroxidation. These results provide valuable information for the development of nanoemulsion-based delivery systems that would improve the antioxidant properties of vitamin A and E.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus