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Effects of Hormone Therapy on Oxidative Stress in Postmenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral hormone therapy (HT) on oxidative stress (OS) in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MetS). A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. We formed four groups of 25 women each; healthy (HW) and MetS women (MSW) were assigned to HT (1 mg/day of estradiol valerate plus 5 mg/10 day of medroxiprogesterone) or placebo. We measured plasma lipoperoxides, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, total plasma antioxidant status and uric acid, as OS markers. Alternative cut-off values of each parameter were defined and a stress score (SS) ranging from 0 to 7 was used as total OS. MetS was defined according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria. Participants were seen at baseline, 3 and 6 months. After 6 months, MetS decreased in MSW-HT (48%), their triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) improved; in the other groups no difference was found. SS in MSW-HT decreased (3.8 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.3, p < 0.05) and OS was also reduced (44%), this effect was evident since 3 mo. HW-HT with high OS also decreased (40%). In placebo groups there was no change. Our findings suggest that HT improve lipids and OS associated to MetS in postmenopausal women.

No MeSH data available.


Diagram of follow-up of the women during the clinical trial. HT: hormone therapy.
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ijms-17-01388-f001: Diagram of follow-up of the women during the clinical trial. HT: hormone therapy.

Mentions: Among the participants in the study, nine women from the four groups did not complete the follow-up. The rates of discontinuation were 10% in the placebo and 8% in the HT groups. In the placebo groups the women reported lack of efficacy, therefore they dropped out. In the HT groups two women reported clinical discomfort and other participants discontinued treatment for personal reasons. Finally, 22 women in the placebo MSW group and 23 in each of the other groups completed the study (Figure 1).


Effects of Hormone Therapy on Oxidative Stress in Postmenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome
Diagram of follow-up of the women during the clinical trial. HT: hormone therapy.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037668&req=5

ijms-17-01388-f001: Diagram of follow-up of the women during the clinical trial. HT: hormone therapy.
Mentions: Among the participants in the study, nine women from the four groups did not complete the follow-up. The rates of discontinuation were 10% in the placebo and 8% in the HT groups. In the placebo groups the women reported lack of efficacy, therefore they dropped out. In the HT groups two women reported clinical discomfort and other participants discontinued treatment for personal reasons. Finally, 22 women in the placebo MSW group and 23 in each of the other groups completed the study (Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral hormone therapy (HT) on oxidative stress (OS) in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MetS). A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. We formed four groups of 25 women each; healthy (HW) and MetS women (MSW) were assigned to HT (1 mg/day of estradiol valerate plus 5 mg/10 day of medroxiprogesterone) or placebo. We measured plasma lipoperoxides, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, total plasma antioxidant status and uric acid, as OS markers. Alternative cut-off values of each parameter were defined and a stress score (SS) ranging from 0 to 7 was used as total OS. MetS was defined according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria. Participants were seen at baseline, 3 and 6 months. After 6 months, MetS decreased in MSW-HT (48%), their triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) improved; in the other groups no difference was found. SS in MSW-HT decreased (3.8 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.3, p < 0.05) and OS was also reduced (44%), this effect was evident since 3 mo. HW-HT with high OS also decreased (40%). In placebo groups there was no change. Our findings suggest that HT improve lipids and OS associated to MetS in postmenopausal women.

No MeSH data available.