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Acute kidney injury 2016: diagnosis and diagnostic workup

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and is associated with serious short- and long-term complications. Early diagnosis and identification of the underlying aetiology are essential to guide management. In this review, we outline the current definition of AKI and the potential pitfalls, and summarise the existing and future tools to investigate AKI in critically ill patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagnosis of AKI based on functional and damage markers. The combination of functional and damage biomarkers allows the clinician to diagnose AKI earlier and to differentiate the disease process better. It is recognised that the process is dynamic and that patients may move from one phase to another. Reproduced with permission from http://www.adqi.org/
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Fig3: Diagnosis of AKI based on functional and damage markers. The combination of functional and damage biomarkers allows the clinician to diagnose AKI earlier and to differentiate the disease process better. It is recognised that the process is dynamic and that patients may move from one phase to another. Reproduced with permission from http://www.adqi.org/

Mentions: The 10th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) Consensus Conference proposed to utilise both function and damage biomarkers in combination with traditional markers of renal function to better define and characterise AKI [35, 40] (Fig. 3). This approach appears to delineate the spectrum of AKI better than serum creatinine and urine output alone and has the potential to transform the way clinicians diagnose and manage patients with AKI.Fig. 3


Acute kidney injury 2016: diagnosis and diagnostic workup
Diagnosis of AKI based on functional and damage markers. The combination of functional and damage biomarkers allows the clinician to diagnose AKI earlier and to differentiate the disease process better. It is recognised that the process is dynamic and that patients may move from one phase to another. Reproduced with permission from http://www.adqi.org/
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037640&req=5

Fig3: Diagnosis of AKI based on functional and damage markers. The combination of functional and damage biomarkers allows the clinician to diagnose AKI earlier and to differentiate the disease process better. It is recognised that the process is dynamic and that patients may move from one phase to another. Reproduced with permission from http://www.adqi.org/
Mentions: The 10th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) Consensus Conference proposed to utilise both function and damage biomarkers in combination with traditional markers of renal function to better define and characterise AKI [35, 40] (Fig. 3). This approach appears to delineate the spectrum of AKI better than serum creatinine and urine output alone and has the potential to transform the way clinicians diagnose and manage patients with AKI.Fig. 3

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and is associated with serious short- and long-term complications. Early diagnosis and identification of the underlying aetiology are essential to guide management. In this review, we outline the current definition of AKI and the potential pitfalls, and summarise the existing and future tools to investigate AKI in critically ill patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus