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Patient health questionnaire-9 versus Edinburgh postnatal depression scale in screening for major depressive episodes: a cross-sectional population-based study

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Major depressive episodes (MDE) are frequent at the population level and are generally associated with severe symptoms that impair performance of activities of daily living of individuals suffering from this condition. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of two tests that separately showed suitable properties in screening for MDE: the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS).

Methods: In a previous study, the sensitivity and specificity of the PHQ-9 and the EPDS in screening for MDE were compared with a structured diagnostic interview conducted by psychiatrics and psychologists using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview as the gold standard. In a sample of adults living in the community in Pelotas, Brazil, the PHQ-9 and EPDS were applied at the same interview and the gold standard on a median of 17 days later. The interviews were carried out at the participant’s home.

Results: 447 individuals (191 men and 256 women) were assessed. The PHQ-9 and the EPDS results were concordant in 87.5 % of the respondents, with a moderate agreement beyond what was expected by chance alone (kappa = 0.61). The areas below the ROC curves were not statistically different (82.1 % for PHQ-9 and 83.5 % for EPDS) (p = 0.291), thus indicating that the two tests had similar moderate accuracy.

Conclusions: PHQ-9 and EPDS may be applied with equal confidence in screening for MDE in the community.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for screening for major depressive episodes among adults living in the community. Areas under the ROC curve: PHQ-9 = 0.821; EPDS = 0.835
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Fig1: Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for screening for major depressive episodes among adults living in the community. Areas under the ROC curve: PHQ-9 = 0.821; EPDS = 0.835

Mentions: The gold-standard interview identified 40 individuals (32 women and eight men) presenting MDE (8.9 %; 6.3–11.6 %). For the PHQ-9, values ≥9 were more accurate for identifying individuals at greater risk of presenting MDE (Fig. 1). At this point, the sensitivity was 77.5 % (61.5–89.2 %), specificity 86.7 % (83.0–89.9 %), positive predictive value 36.5 % (26.3–47.6 %), and positive likelihood ratio 5.8 (4.3–7.9) (Table 1). A total of 85 individuals (19.0 %) scored ≥9. The area under the ROC curve indicated a general test accuracy of 82.1 %.Fig. 1


Patient health questionnaire-9 versus Edinburgh postnatal depression scale in screening for major depressive episodes: a cross-sectional population-based study
Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for screening for major depressive episodes among adults living in the community. Areas under the ROC curve: PHQ-9 = 0.821; EPDS = 0.835
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037593&req=5

Fig1: Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) for screening for major depressive episodes among adults living in the community. Areas under the ROC curve: PHQ-9 = 0.821; EPDS = 0.835
Mentions: The gold-standard interview identified 40 individuals (32 women and eight men) presenting MDE (8.9 %; 6.3–11.6 %). For the PHQ-9, values ≥9 were more accurate for identifying individuals at greater risk of presenting MDE (Fig. 1). At this point, the sensitivity was 77.5 % (61.5–89.2 %), specificity 86.7 % (83.0–89.9 %), positive predictive value 36.5 % (26.3–47.6 %), and positive likelihood ratio 5.8 (4.3–7.9) (Table 1). A total of 85 individuals (19.0 %) scored ≥9. The area under the ROC curve indicated a general test accuracy of 82.1 %.Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Major depressive episodes (MDE) are frequent at the population level and are generally associated with severe symptoms that impair performance of activities of daily living of individuals suffering from this condition. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of two tests that separately showed suitable properties in screening for MDE: the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS).

Methods: In a previous study, the sensitivity and specificity of the PHQ-9 and the EPDS in screening for MDE were compared with a structured diagnostic interview conducted by psychiatrics and psychologists using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview as the gold standard. In a sample of adults living in the community in Pelotas, Brazil, the PHQ-9 and EPDS were applied at the same interview and the gold standard on a median of 17 days later. The interviews were carried out at the participant’s home.

Results: 447 individuals (191 men and 256 women) were assessed. The PHQ-9 and the EPDS results were concordant in 87.5 % of the respondents, with a moderate agreement beyond what was expected by chance alone (kappa = 0.61). The areas below the ROC curves were not statistically different (82.1 % for PHQ-9 and 83.5 % for EPDS) (p = 0.291), thus indicating that the two tests had similar moderate accuracy.

Conclusions: PHQ-9 and EPDS may be applied with equal confidence in screening for MDE in the community.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus