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The Use of Fish Oil with Warfarin Does Not Significantly Affect either the International Normalised Ratio or Incidence of Adverse Events in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Deep Vein Thrombosis: A Retrospective Study

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Warfarin is a leading anticoagulant in the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Drug interactions influence the safety of warfarin use and while extensive literature exists regarding the effect on warfarin control and bleeding incidence with many medicines, there is little evidence on the influence of complementary medicines. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of fish and krill oil supplementation on warfarin control and bleeding incidence in AF and DVT patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted utilising patient information from a large private pathology clinic. AF and DVT patients receiving long-term warfarin therapy (>30 days) at the clinic and taking fish and krill oil supplements were eligible for study inclusion. Results: Of the 2081 patients assessed, a total of 573 warfarin users met the inclusion criteria with 145 patients in the fish and krill oil group (supplement group) and 428 patients in the control group. Overall, it was found that fish and krill oils did not significantly alter warfarin time in therapeutic range (TTR) or bleeding incidence, even when compared by gender. Conclusion: Omega-3 supplementation with fish and krill oil does not significantly affect long-term warfarin control and bleeding and thromboembolic events when consumed concurrently in patients managed at an anticoagulation clinic.

No MeSH data available.


Mean TTR for patients before, during, and after fish oil supplementation. Data is shown as the mean and standard deviation, n = 24.
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nutrients-08-00578-f002: Mean TTR for patients before, during, and after fish oil supplementation. Data is shown as the mean and standard deviation, n = 24.

Mentions: A mean TTR comparison by gender identified no differences between males and females in the supplement or control group (Figure 2). In addition, no difference was found in the mean TTR between male supplement and control patients or between female supplement and control patients. There were no statistically significant differences identified in the comparison of bleeding incidence across all groups (Table 2).


The Use of Fish Oil with Warfarin Does Not Significantly Affect either the International Normalised Ratio or Incidence of Adverse Events in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Deep Vein Thrombosis: A Retrospective Study
Mean TTR for patients before, during, and after fish oil supplementation. Data is shown as the mean and standard deviation, n = 24.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037562&req=5

nutrients-08-00578-f002: Mean TTR for patients before, during, and after fish oil supplementation. Data is shown as the mean and standard deviation, n = 24.
Mentions: A mean TTR comparison by gender identified no differences between males and females in the supplement or control group (Figure 2). In addition, no difference was found in the mean TTR between male supplement and control patients or between female supplement and control patients. There were no statistically significant differences identified in the comparison of bleeding incidence across all groups (Table 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Warfarin is a leading anticoagulant in the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Drug interactions influence the safety of warfarin use and while extensive literature exists regarding the effect on warfarin control and bleeding incidence with many medicines, there is little evidence on the influence of complementary medicines. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of fish and krill oil supplementation on warfarin control and bleeding incidence in AF and DVT patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted utilising patient information from a large private pathology clinic. AF and DVT patients receiving long-term warfarin therapy (>30 days) at the clinic and taking fish and krill oil supplements were eligible for study inclusion. Results: Of the 2081 patients assessed, a total of 573 warfarin users met the inclusion criteria with 145 patients in the fish and krill oil group (supplement group) and 428 patients in the control group. Overall, it was found that fish and krill oils did not significantly alter warfarin time in therapeutic range (TTR) or bleeding incidence, even when compared by gender. Conclusion: Omega-3 supplementation with fish and krill oil does not significantly affect long-term warfarin control and bleeding and thromboembolic events when consumed concurrently in patients managed at an anticoagulation clinic.

No MeSH data available.