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Reaching Low-Income Mothers to Improve Family Fruit and Vegetable Intake: Food Hero Social Marketing Campaign — Research Steps, Development and Testing

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to create/test a social marketing campaign to increase fruit/vegetable (FV) intake within Oregon Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) eligible families. Focus groups (n = 2) and pre/post campaign phone surveys (n = 2082) were conducted in intervention counties (IC) and one control county. Participants were female (86%–100%) with 1–2 children at home. Mean FV intake/without juice was 3.1 servings/day; >50% preferred the Internet for delivery of healthy eating information. Participants reported time/financial burdens, low household FV variety and desirability of frozen/canned FV, and acceptance of positive messages. A Food Hero (FH) campaign was created/delivered daily August–October 2009 to mothers through multiple channels (e.g., grocery stores, online, educators). Results showed that the IC had better FH name recall (12%) and interpretation of intended messages (60%) vs. control (3%, 23%, respectively). Compared to controls, the IC were less likely to report healthy food preparation as time consuming or a FV rich diet expensive, and it was easier to get their family to eat fruit. Results did not vary based on county/household characteristics. The FH campaign increased FH awareness and positive FV beliefs. A longer campaign with FV assessments will increase understanding of the target audience, and allow for campaign refinement.

No MeSH data available.


Food Hero development steps, goals and timeline.
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nutrients-08-00562-f001: Food Hero development steps, goals and timeline.

Mentions: Two contractors were hired to add expertise to the campaign development team, a business research firm and a SM firm. The research firm (Close to the Customer Project, OSU’s School of Business) assisted with writing research phone surveys (PS) and focus group (FG) questions, managed all phases of participant recruitment, lead the FGs, produced verbatim transcripts of FG discussions and analyzed FG data for common themes, conducted PSs, analyzed the data, and created data summary reports. The SM firm (EnviroMedia, Portland, OR, USA) assisted with brand creation, campaign message development, project management, and gave input into PS and FG questions. The campaign development included the eight elements of the SM benchmark criteria [17]. OSU’s nutrition researchers gave input on all steps of the project (Figure 1).


Reaching Low-Income Mothers to Improve Family Fruit and Vegetable Intake: Food Hero Social Marketing Campaign — Research Steps, Development and Testing
Food Hero development steps, goals and timeline.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037547&req=5

nutrients-08-00562-f001: Food Hero development steps, goals and timeline.
Mentions: Two contractors were hired to add expertise to the campaign development team, a business research firm and a SM firm. The research firm (Close to the Customer Project, OSU’s School of Business) assisted with writing research phone surveys (PS) and focus group (FG) questions, managed all phases of participant recruitment, lead the FGs, produced verbatim transcripts of FG discussions and analyzed FG data for common themes, conducted PSs, analyzed the data, and created data summary reports. The SM firm (EnviroMedia, Portland, OR, USA) assisted with brand creation, campaign message development, project management, and gave input into PS and FG questions. The campaign development included the eight elements of the SM benchmark criteria [17]. OSU’s nutrition researchers gave input on all steps of the project (Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to create/test a social marketing campaign to increase fruit/vegetable (FV) intake within Oregon Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) eligible families. Focus groups (n = 2) and pre/post campaign phone surveys (n = 2082) were conducted in intervention counties (IC) and one control county. Participants were female (86%–100%) with 1–2 children at home. Mean FV intake/without juice was 3.1 servings/day; >50% preferred the Internet for delivery of healthy eating information. Participants reported time/financial burdens, low household FV variety and desirability of frozen/canned FV, and acceptance of positive messages. A Food Hero (FH) campaign was created/delivered daily August–October 2009 to mothers through multiple channels (e.g., grocery stores, online, educators). Results showed that the IC had better FH name recall (12%) and interpretation of intended messages (60%) vs. control (3%, 23%, respectively). Compared to controls, the IC were less likely to report healthy food preparation as time consuming or a FV rich diet expensive, and it was easier to get their family to eat fruit. Results did not vary based on county/household characteristics. The FH campaign increased FH awareness and positive FV beliefs. A longer campaign with FV assessments will increase understanding of the target audience, and allow for campaign refinement.

No MeSH data available.