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Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were “Healthy”, “Monotonous”, “Vegetarian”, “Japanese”, “Low energy”, and “Traditional” diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the “Japanese diet” decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care.

No MeSH data available.


The 2h-PG and FPG of participants selected different dietary patterns. (a) the 2h-PG and FPG value; (b) HbA1c value; (c) the reduction of FPG, 2h-PG and HbA1c. Diet 1, Traditional diet; Diet 2, Vegetarian diet; Diet 3, Japanese diet; Diet 4, Low energy diet; Diet 5, Healthy diet; Diet 6, Monotonous diet. The results were expressed as mean (standard deviation). a compared with PG value at baseline (p < 0.05); b compared with HbA1c value at baseline (p < 0.05); c HbA1c value at the baseline compared with the diet 1 (p < 0.05); d HbA1c value after 1 year was compared with the diet 2 (p < 0.05); e HbA1c value reduction was compared with the diet 5 (p < 0.05); * compared with 2h-PG value of diet 1 at the baseline (p < 0.05).
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nutrients-08-00560-f003: The 2h-PG and FPG of participants selected different dietary patterns. (a) the 2h-PG and FPG value; (b) HbA1c value; (c) the reduction of FPG, 2h-PG and HbA1c. Diet 1, Traditional diet; Diet 2, Vegetarian diet; Diet 3, Japanese diet; Diet 4, Low energy diet; Diet 5, Healthy diet; Diet 6, Monotonous diet. The results were expressed as mean (standard deviation). a compared with PG value at baseline (p < 0.05); b compared with HbA1c value at baseline (p < 0.05); c HbA1c value at the baseline compared with the diet 1 (p < 0.05); d HbA1c value after 1 year was compared with the diet 2 (p < 0.05); e HbA1c value reduction was compared with the diet 5 (p < 0.05); * compared with 2h-PG value of diet 1 at the baseline (p < 0.05).

Mentions: Differences in the participants’ dietary patterns have an impact on their PG levels (Figure 3). FPG and 2h-PG decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after the one-year intervention. Participants who selected “Japanese” diet presented the lowest FPG among the six patterns (p < 0.05). The 2h-PG value at baseline for participants who selected the “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets were relatively high. “Healthy” diet yielded higher 2h-PG than “Traditional ”diet (p < 0.05), while the new 2h-PG values after the one-year intervention were close to normal. Figure 3b shows where the HbA1c values also significantly decreased after one year (p < 0.05). At baseline, the HbA1c value of “Healthy” diet was highest and was significantly lower than “Vegetarian” diet after one year (p < 0.05). Reduction of FPG, 2h-PG, and HbA1c are shown in Figure 3c. The HbA1c reduction in “Healthy” diet was highest (19.42%)—considerably higher than “traditional diet” (5.02%) (p < 0.05) and “vegetarian diet” (6.21%) (p < 0.05), and “Vegetarian” diet resulted in the highest 2h-PG among all six diets (p < 0.05). FPG reduction was most obvious in “Japanese” diet.


Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients
The 2h-PG and FPG of participants selected different dietary patterns. (a) the 2h-PG and FPG value; (b) HbA1c value; (c) the reduction of FPG, 2h-PG and HbA1c. Diet 1, Traditional diet; Diet 2, Vegetarian diet; Diet 3, Japanese diet; Diet 4, Low energy diet; Diet 5, Healthy diet; Diet 6, Monotonous diet. The results were expressed as mean (standard deviation). a compared with PG value at baseline (p < 0.05); b compared with HbA1c value at baseline (p < 0.05); c HbA1c value at the baseline compared with the diet 1 (p < 0.05); d HbA1c value after 1 year was compared with the diet 2 (p < 0.05); e HbA1c value reduction was compared with the diet 5 (p < 0.05); * compared with 2h-PG value of diet 1 at the baseline (p < 0.05).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
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nutrients-08-00560-f003: The 2h-PG and FPG of participants selected different dietary patterns. (a) the 2h-PG and FPG value; (b) HbA1c value; (c) the reduction of FPG, 2h-PG and HbA1c. Diet 1, Traditional diet; Diet 2, Vegetarian diet; Diet 3, Japanese diet; Diet 4, Low energy diet; Diet 5, Healthy diet; Diet 6, Monotonous diet. The results were expressed as mean (standard deviation). a compared with PG value at baseline (p < 0.05); b compared with HbA1c value at baseline (p < 0.05); c HbA1c value at the baseline compared with the diet 1 (p < 0.05); d HbA1c value after 1 year was compared with the diet 2 (p < 0.05); e HbA1c value reduction was compared with the diet 5 (p < 0.05); * compared with 2h-PG value of diet 1 at the baseline (p < 0.05).
Mentions: Differences in the participants’ dietary patterns have an impact on their PG levels (Figure 3). FPG and 2h-PG decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after the one-year intervention. Participants who selected “Japanese” diet presented the lowest FPG among the six patterns (p < 0.05). The 2h-PG value at baseline for participants who selected the “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets were relatively high. “Healthy” diet yielded higher 2h-PG than “Traditional ”diet (p < 0.05), while the new 2h-PG values after the one-year intervention were close to normal. Figure 3b shows where the HbA1c values also significantly decreased after one year (p < 0.05). At baseline, the HbA1c value of “Healthy” diet was highest and was significantly lower than “Vegetarian” diet after one year (p < 0.05). Reduction of FPG, 2h-PG, and HbA1c are shown in Figure 3c. The HbA1c reduction in “Healthy” diet was highest (19.42%)—considerably higher than “traditional diet” (5.02%) (p < 0.05) and “vegetarian diet” (6.21%) (p < 0.05), and “Vegetarian” diet resulted in the highest 2h-PG among all six diets (p < 0.05). FPG reduction was most obvious in “Japanese” diet.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were &ldquo;Healthy&rdquo;, &ldquo;Monotonous&rdquo;, &ldquo;Vegetarian&rdquo;, &ldquo;Japanese&rdquo;, &ldquo;Low energy&rdquo;, and &ldquo;Traditional&rdquo; diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the &ldquo;Japanese diet&rdquo; decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected &ldquo;Japanese&rdquo; and &ldquo;Healthy&rdquo; diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. &ldquo;Japanese&rdquo; and &ldquo;Healthy&rdquo; diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, &ldquo;Japanese&rdquo; and &ldquo;Healthy&rdquo; diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care.

No MeSH data available.