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Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were “Healthy”, “Monotonous”, “Vegetarian”, “Japanese”, “Low energy”, and “Traditional” diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the “Japanese diet” decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care.

No MeSH data available.


Flow diagram of subjects’ participation in the trial.
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nutrients-08-00560-f001: Flow diagram of subjects’ participation in the trial.

Mentions: During the one-month centralized intervention portion of the study, all participants received uniformly arranged accommodation in a community health center in Baotou City under the supervision of strictly trained managers including nurses, diabetes educators, registered dietitians, and research staff. After a 1-week run-in period, the participants were randomized by a computer-generated number table and assigned accordingly into three groups. The “structured diet group” (Group A) was provided a standard diet, and “intervention oat groups” (Groups B and C) were provided the same diet coupled with a 50 or 100 g/day oat substitution for the equivalent grain (the Flow diagram of subjects’ participation is shown in Figure 1). The structured diet included foods typical of a standard diet in China, and was designed on a 7-day rotation according to the the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident [18] and the China Medical Nutrition Therapy Guideline for Diabetes 2010 [19], in which carbohydrate, protein, and fat provided 60%, 18%, and 22% of total energy, respectively (detailed information of the structured diet is shown in Table S1).


Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients
Flow diagram of subjects’ participation in the trial.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037545&req=5

nutrients-08-00560-f001: Flow diagram of subjects’ participation in the trial.
Mentions: During the one-month centralized intervention portion of the study, all participants received uniformly arranged accommodation in a community health center in Baotou City under the supervision of strictly trained managers including nurses, diabetes educators, registered dietitians, and research staff. After a 1-week run-in period, the participants were randomized by a computer-generated number table and assigned accordingly into three groups. The “structured diet group” (Group A) was provided a standard diet, and “intervention oat groups” (Groups B and C) were provided the same diet coupled with a 50 or 100 g/day oat substitution for the equivalent grain (the Flow diagram of subjects’ participation is shown in Figure 1). The structured diet included foods typical of a standard diet in China, and was designed on a 7-day rotation according to the the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident [18] and the China Medical Nutrition Therapy Guideline for Diabetes 2010 [19], in which carbohydrate, protein, and fat provided 60%, 18%, and 22% of total energy, respectively (detailed information of the structured diet is shown in Table S1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were “Healthy”, “Monotonous”, “Vegetarian”, “Japanese”, “Low energy”, and “Traditional” diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the “Japanese diet” decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care.

No MeSH data available.