Limits...
Supplemental Protein during Heavy Cycling Training and Recovery Impacts Skeletal Muscle and Heart Rate Responses but Not Performance

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The effects of protein supplementation on cycling performance, skeletal muscle function, and heart rate responses to exercise were examined following intensified (ICT) and reduced-volume training (RVT). Seven cyclists performed consecutive periods of normal training (NT), ICT (10 days; average training duration 220% of NT), and RVT (10 days; training duration 66% of NT). In a crossover design, subjects consumed supplemental carbohydrate (CHO) or an equal amount of carbohydrate with added protein (CP) during and following each exercise session (CP = +0.94 g/kg/day protein during ICT; +0.39 g/kg/day during RVT). A 30-kilometer time trial performance (following 120 min at 50% Wmax) was modestly impaired following ICT (+2.4 ± 6.4% versus NT) and returned to baseline levels following RVT (−0.7 ± 4.5% versus NT), with similar responses between CHO and CP. Skeletal muscle torque at 120 deg/s benefited from CP, compared to CHO, following ICT. However, this effect was no longer present at RVT. Following ICT, muscle fiber cross-sectional area was increased with CP, while there were no clear changes with CHO. Reductions in constant-load heart rates (at 50% Wmax) following RVT were likely greater with CP than CHO (−9 ± 9 bpm). Overall it appears that CP supplementation impacted skeletal muscle and heart rate responses during a period of heavy training and recovery, but this did not result in meaningful changes in time trial performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of Training Periods and Nutritional Supplementation on Muscle Soreness (Mean ± SD). Within-treatment effects: VL-N = Very likely different than NT; VL-I = Very likely different than ICT; No between-treatment effects were observed. NT = normal training; ICT = intensified cycle training; RVT = reduced volume training; CHO = carbohydrate supplementation; CP = carbohydrate + protein supplementation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037535&req=5

nutrients-08-00550-f005: Effects of Training Periods and Nutritional Supplementation on Muscle Soreness (Mean ± SD). Within-treatment effects: VL-N = Very likely different than NT; VL-I = Very likely different than ICT; No between-treatment effects were observed. NT = normal training; ICT = intensified cycle training; RVT = reduced volume training; CHO = carbohydrate supplementation; CP = carbohydrate + protein supplementation.

Mentions: Changes in muscle fiber cross-sectional area are shown in Table 4. There were no clear changes amongst fiber CSA throughout the CHO treatment. However, with CP supplementation, MHC I CSA very likely increased (13.6% ± 8.0%) and MHC IIa likely increased (16.4% ± 19.4%) from NT to ICT. This resulted in a likely treatment difference in MHC I fiber CSA response from NT to ICT (comparisons to the RVT time point are not available due to insufficient tissue yields for 2 subjects in CP). Muscle soreness values for each training period are shown in Figure 5. Soreness very likely increased from NT to ICT (with both CHO and CP) and very likely decreased to baseline levels following RVT, with no clear treatment differences.


Supplemental Protein during Heavy Cycling Training and Recovery Impacts Skeletal Muscle and Heart Rate Responses but Not Performance
Effects of Training Periods and Nutritional Supplementation on Muscle Soreness (Mean ± SD). Within-treatment effects: VL-N = Very likely different than NT; VL-I = Very likely different than ICT; No between-treatment effects were observed. NT = normal training; ICT = intensified cycle training; RVT = reduced volume training; CHO = carbohydrate supplementation; CP = carbohydrate + protein supplementation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037535&req=5

nutrients-08-00550-f005: Effects of Training Periods and Nutritional Supplementation on Muscle Soreness (Mean ± SD). Within-treatment effects: VL-N = Very likely different than NT; VL-I = Very likely different than ICT; No between-treatment effects were observed. NT = normal training; ICT = intensified cycle training; RVT = reduced volume training; CHO = carbohydrate supplementation; CP = carbohydrate + protein supplementation.
Mentions: Changes in muscle fiber cross-sectional area are shown in Table 4. There were no clear changes amongst fiber CSA throughout the CHO treatment. However, with CP supplementation, MHC I CSA very likely increased (13.6% ± 8.0%) and MHC IIa likely increased (16.4% ± 19.4%) from NT to ICT. This resulted in a likely treatment difference in MHC I fiber CSA response from NT to ICT (comparisons to the RVT time point are not available due to insufficient tissue yields for 2 subjects in CP). Muscle soreness values for each training period are shown in Figure 5. Soreness very likely increased from NT to ICT (with both CHO and CP) and very likely decreased to baseline levels following RVT, with no clear treatment differences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The effects of protein supplementation on cycling performance, skeletal muscle function, and heart rate responses to exercise were examined following intensified (ICT) and reduced-volume training (RVT). Seven cyclists performed consecutive periods of normal training (NT), ICT (10 days; average training duration 220% of NT), and RVT (10 days; training duration 66% of NT). In a crossover design, subjects consumed supplemental carbohydrate (CHO) or an equal amount of carbohydrate with added protein (CP) during and following each exercise session (CP = +0.94 g/kg/day protein during ICT; +0.39 g/kg/day during RVT). A 30-kilometer time trial performance (following 120 min at 50% Wmax) was modestly impaired following ICT (+2.4 ± 6.4% versus NT) and returned to baseline levels following RVT (−0.7 ± 4.5% versus NT), with similar responses between CHO and CP. Skeletal muscle torque at 120 deg/s benefited from CP, compared to CHO, following ICT. However, this effect was no longer present at RVT. Following ICT, muscle fiber cross-sectional area was increased with CP, while there were no clear changes with CHO. Reductions in constant-load heart rates (at 50% Wmax) following RVT were likely greater with CP than CHO (−9 ± 9 bpm). Overall it appears that CP supplementation impacted skeletal muscle and heart rate responses during a period of heavy training and recovery, but this did not result in meaningful changes in time trial performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus