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Supplemental Protein during Heavy Cycling Training and Recovery Impacts Skeletal Muscle and Heart Rate Responses but Not Performance

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ABSTRACT

The effects of protein supplementation on cycling performance, skeletal muscle function, and heart rate responses to exercise were examined following intensified (ICT) and reduced-volume training (RVT). Seven cyclists performed consecutive periods of normal training (NT), ICT (10 days; average training duration 220% of NT), and RVT (10 days; training duration 66% of NT). In a crossover design, subjects consumed supplemental carbohydrate (CHO) or an equal amount of carbohydrate with added protein (CP) during and following each exercise session (CP = +0.94 g/kg/day protein during ICT; +0.39 g/kg/day during RVT). A 30-kilometer time trial performance (following 120 min at 50% Wmax) was modestly impaired following ICT (+2.4 ± 6.4% versus NT) and returned to baseline levels following RVT (−0.7 ± 4.5% versus NT), with similar responses between CHO and CP. Skeletal muscle torque at 120 deg/s benefited from CP, compared to CHO, following ICT. However, this effect was no longer present at RVT. Following ICT, muscle fiber cross-sectional area was increased with CP, while there were no clear changes with CHO. Reductions in constant-load heart rates (at 50% Wmax) following RVT were likely greater with CP than CHO (−9 ± 9 bpm). Overall it appears that CP supplementation impacted skeletal muscle and heart rate responses during a period of heavy training and recovery, but this did not result in meaningful changes in time trial performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cycling Performance (Mean ± SD) during Normal, Intensified, and Reduced-Volume Training. Within-treatment effects: P-N = Possibly different than NT; L-N = Likely different than NT; L-I = Likely different than ICT. No between-treatment effects were observed. NT = normal training; ICT = intensified cycle training; RVT = reduced volume training; CHO = carbohydrate supplementation; CP = carbohydrate + protein supplementation.
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nutrients-08-00550-f002: Cycling Performance (Mean ± SD) during Normal, Intensified, and Reduced-Volume Training. Within-treatment effects: P-N = Possibly different than NT; L-N = Likely different than NT; L-I = Likely different than ICT. No between-treatment effects were observed. NT = normal training; ICT = intensified cycle training; RVT = reduced volume training; CHO = carbohydrate supplementation; CP = carbohydrate + protein supplementation.

Mentions: Pre-loaded 30-km TT times are shown in Figure 2, and tended to get slower from NT (CHO: 56.0 ± 5.3 min; CP: 55.6 ± 6.2 min) to ICT (CHO: 57.3 ± 8.3 min; CP: 57.2 ± 7.8 min) and return to baseline levels following RVT (CHO: 55.3 ± 5.3; CP: 55.7 ± 7.8 min), with no between-treatment effects. Similarly, all treatment differences in power output between CHO (NT: 191 ± 48; ICT: 188 ± 53; RVT: 198 ± 41 W) and CP (NT: 201 ± 54; ICT: 187 ± 47; RVT: 201 ± 61 W) were unclear.


Supplemental Protein during Heavy Cycling Training and Recovery Impacts Skeletal Muscle and Heart Rate Responses but Not Performance
Cycling Performance (Mean ± SD) during Normal, Intensified, and Reduced-Volume Training. Within-treatment effects: P-N = Possibly different than NT; L-N = Likely different than NT; L-I = Likely different than ICT. No between-treatment effects were observed. NT = normal training; ICT = intensified cycle training; RVT = reduced volume training; CHO = carbohydrate supplementation; CP = carbohydrate + protein supplementation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037535&req=5

nutrients-08-00550-f002: Cycling Performance (Mean ± SD) during Normal, Intensified, and Reduced-Volume Training. Within-treatment effects: P-N = Possibly different than NT; L-N = Likely different than NT; L-I = Likely different than ICT. No between-treatment effects were observed. NT = normal training; ICT = intensified cycle training; RVT = reduced volume training; CHO = carbohydrate supplementation; CP = carbohydrate + protein supplementation.
Mentions: Pre-loaded 30-km TT times are shown in Figure 2, and tended to get slower from NT (CHO: 56.0 ± 5.3 min; CP: 55.6 ± 6.2 min) to ICT (CHO: 57.3 ± 8.3 min; CP: 57.2 ± 7.8 min) and return to baseline levels following RVT (CHO: 55.3 ± 5.3; CP: 55.7 ± 7.8 min), with no between-treatment effects. Similarly, all treatment differences in power output between CHO (NT: 191 ± 48; ICT: 188 ± 53; RVT: 198 ± 41 W) and CP (NT: 201 ± 54; ICT: 187 ± 47; RVT: 201 ± 61 W) were unclear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The effects of protein supplementation on cycling performance, skeletal muscle function, and heart rate responses to exercise were examined following intensified (ICT) and reduced-volume training (RVT). Seven cyclists performed consecutive periods of normal training (NT), ICT (10 days; average training duration 220% of NT), and RVT (10 days; training duration 66% of NT). In a crossover design, subjects consumed supplemental carbohydrate (CHO) or an equal amount of carbohydrate with added protein (CP) during and following each exercise session (CP = +0.94 g/kg/day protein during ICT; +0.39 g/kg/day during RVT). A 30-kilometer time trial performance (following 120 min at 50% Wmax) was modestly impaired following ICT (+2.4 ± 6.4% versus NT) and returned to baseline levels following RVT (−0.7 ± 4.5% versus NT), with similar responses between CHO and CP. Skeletal muscle torque at 120 deg/s benefited from CP, compared to CHO, following ICT. However, this effect was no longer present at RVT. Following ICT, muscle fiber cross-sectional area was increased with CP, while there were no clear changes with CHO. Reductions in constant-load heart rates (at 50% Wmax) following RVT were likely greater with CP than CHO (−9 ± 9 bpm). Overall it appears that CP supplementation impacted skeletal muscle and heart rate responses during a period of heavy training and recovery, but this did not result in meaningful changes in time trial performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus