Limits...
Gender- and Age-Specific REE and REE/FFM Distributions in Healthy Chinese Adults

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Basic data on the resting energy expenditure (REE) of healthy populations are currently rare, especially for developing countries. The aims of the present study were to describe gender- and age-specific REE distributions and to evaluate the relationships among glycolipid metabolism, eating behaviors, and REE in healthy Chinese adults. This cross-sectional survey included 540 subjects (343 women and 197 men, 20–79 years old). REE was measured by indirect calorimetry and expressed as kcal/day/kg total body weight. The data were presented as the means and percentiles for REE and the REE to fat-free mass (FFM) ratio; differences were described by gender and age. Partial correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlations between REE, tertiles of REE/FFM, and glycolipid metabolism and eating behaviors. In this study, we confirmed a decline in REE with age in women (p = 0.000) and men (p = 0.000), and we found that men have a higher REE (p = 0.000) and lower REE/FFM (p = 0.021) than women. Furthermore, we observed no associations among glycolipid metabolism, eating behaviors, and REE in healthy Chinese adults. In conclusion, the results presented here may be useful to clinicians and nutritionists for comparing healthy and ill subjects and identifying changes in REE that are related to aging, malnutrition, and chronic diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Gender- and age-specific resting energy expenditure (REE) (A) and REE/FFM (B) distributions. p-Value, statistically significant difference of mean values across age groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037523&req=5

nutrients-08-00536-f001: Gender- and age-specific resting energy expenditure (REE) (A) and REE/FFM (B) distributions. p-Value, statistically significant difference of mean values across age groups.

Mentions: Table 3 and Figure 1 show results for REE and REE/FFM (means, standard deviation and percentiles) by age group for women and men. REE was higher in men than in women (p = 0.000). Of these men, 95% had REE values between 16.82 and 30.58 kcal/day/kg. For women, 95% had REEs between 16.19 and 28.94 kcal/day/kg. On the contrary, REE/FFM was significantly lower in men than in women (p = 0.021). Of these men, 95% had REE/FFM ratios between 21.77 and 41.54 kcal/day/kg. For women, 95% had REE/FFM ratios between 23.39 and 41.00 kcal/day/kg. ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference in REE by age group in men (p = 0.000) and women (p = 0.000), but no significant difference in REE/FFM by age group in men and women. Multiple comparison procedures using Tukey’s test showed that for men differences were significant between the youngest groups (20–34 year) and the other three groups (35–49, 50–64, and 65–79 years). For women, differences were significant between all groups, with the exception of the 50–64 and 65–79 years groups.


Gender- and Age-Specific REE and REE/FFM Distributions in Healthy Chinese Adults
Gender- and age-specific resting energy expenditure (REE) (A) and REE/FFM (B) distributions. p-Value, statistically significant difference of mean values across age groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037523&req=5

nutrients-08-00536-f001: Gender- and age-specific resting energy expenditure (REE) (A) and REE/FFM (B) distributions. p-Value, statistically significant difference of mean values across age groups.
Mentions: Table 3 and Figure 1 show results for REE and REE/FFM (means, standard deviation and percentiles) by age group for women and men. REE was higher in men than in women (p = 0.000). Of these men, 95% had REE values between 16.82 and 30.58 kcal/day/kg. For women, 95% had REEs between 16.19 and 28.94 kcal/day/kg. On the contrary, REE/FFM was significantly lower in men than in women (p = 0.021). Of these men, 95% had REE/FFM ratios between 21.77 and 41.54 kcal/day/kg. For women, 95% had REE/FFM ratios between 23.39 and 41.00 kcal/day/kg. ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference in REE by age group in men (p = 0.000) and women (p = 0.000), but no significant difference in REE/FFM by age group in men and women. Multiple comparison procedures using Tukey’s test showed that for men differences were significant between the youngest groups (20–34 year) and the other three groups (35–49, 50–64, and 65–79 years). For women, differences were significant between all groups, with the exception of the 50–64 and 65–79 years groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Basic data on the resting energy expenditure (REE) of healthy populations are currently rare, especially for developing countries. The aims of the present study were to describe gender- and age-specific REE distributions and to evaluate the relationships among glycolipid metabolism, eating behaviors, and REE in healthy Chinese adults. This cross-sectional survey included 540 subjects (343 women and 197 men, 20–79 years old). REE was measured by indirect calorimetry and expressed as kcal/day/kg total body weight. The data were presented as the means and percentiles for REE and the REE to fat-free mass (FFM) ratio; differences were described by gender and age. Partial correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlations between REE, tertiles of REE/FFM, and glycolipid metabolism and eating behaviors. In this study, we confirmed a decline in REE with age in women (p = 0.000) and men (p = 0.000), and we found that men have a higher REE (p = 0.000) and lower REE/FFM (p = 0.021) than women. Furthermore, we observed no associations among glycolipid metabolism, eating behaviors, and REE in healthy Chinese adults. In conclusion, the results presented here may be useful to clinicians and nutritionists for comparing healthy and ill subjects and identifying changes in REE that are related to aging, malnutrition, and chronic diseases.

No MeSH data available.