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Effects of a Short-Term High-Nitrate Diet on Exercise Performance

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

It has been reported that nitrate supplementation can improve exercise performance. Most of the studies have used either beetroot juice or sodium nitrate as a supplement; there is lack of data on the potential ergogenic benefits of an increased dietary nitrate intake from a diet based on fruits and vegetables. Our aim was to assess whether a high-nitrate diet increases nitric oxide bioavailability and to evaluate the effects of this nutritional intervention on exercise performance. Seven healthy male subjects participated in a randomized cross-over study. They were tested before and after 6 days of a high (HND) or control (CD) nitrate diet (~8.2 mmol∙day−1 or ~2.9 mmol∙day−1, respectively). Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were significantly higher in HND (127 ± 64 µM and 350 ± 120 nM, respectively) compared to CD (23 ± 10 µM and 240 ± 100 nM, respectively). In HND (vs. CD) were observed: (a) a significant reduction of oxygen consumption during moderate-intensity constant work-rate cycling exercise (1.178 ± 0.141 vs. 1.269 ± 0.136 L·min−1); (b) a significantly higher total muscle work during fatiguing, intermittent sub-maximal isometric knee extension (357.3 ± 176.1 vs. 253.6 ± 149.0 Nm·s·kg−1); (c) an improved performance in Repeated Sprint Ability test. These findings suggest that a high-nitrate diet could be a feasible and effective strategy to improve exercise performance.

No MeSH data available.


Repeated sprint ability test. Mean values (±SD) of peak power output (PP) obtained during the five bouts of the repeated sprint ability test (RSA) performed on a cycle ergometer after CD and HND. * p < 0.05.
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nutrients-08-00534-f002: Repeated sprint ability test. Mean values (±SD) of peak power output (PP) obtained during the five bouts of the repeated sprint ability test (RSA) performed on a cycle ergometer after CD and HND. * p < 0.05.

Mentions: There was no difference in absolute PP output (Figure 2) of the first two sprints between HND (701.9 ± 80.8 W and 704.2 ± 80.0 W) and CD (669.6 ± 81.8 W, 675.9 ± 92.1 W).


Effects of a Short-Term High-Nitrate Diet on Exercise Performance
Repeated sprint ability test. Mean values (±SD) of peak power output (PP) obtained during the five bouts of the repeated sprint ability test (RSA) performed on a cycle ergometer after CD and HND. * p < 0.05.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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nutrients-08-00534-f002: Repeated sprint ability test. Mean values (±SD) of peak power output (PP) obtained during the five bouts of the repeated sprint ability test (RSA) performed on a cycle ergometer after CD and HND. * p < 0.05.
Mentions: There was no difference in absolute PP output (Figure 2) of the first two sprints between HND (701.9 ± 80.8 W and 704.2 ± 80.0 W) and CD (669.6 ± 81.8 W, 675.9 ± 92.1 W).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

It has been reported that nitrate supplementation can improve exercise performance. Most of the studies have used either beetroot juice or sodium nitrate as a supplement; there is lack of data on the potential ergogenic benefits of an increased dietary nitrate intake from a diet based on fruits and vegetables. Our aim was to assess whether a high-nitrate diet increases nitric oxide bioavailability and to evaluate the effects of this nutritional intervention on exercise performance. Seven healthy male subjects participated in a randomized cross-over study. They were tested before and after 6 days of a high (HND) or control (CD) nitrate diet (~8.2 mmol&#8729;day&minus;1 or ~2.9 mmol&#8729;day&minus;1, respectively). Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were significantly higher in HND (127 &plusmn; 64 &micro;M and 350 &plusmn; 120 nM, respectively) compared to CD (23 &plusmn; 10 &micro;M and 240 &plusmn; 100 nM, respectively). In HND (vs. CD) were observed: (a) a significant reduction of oxygen consumption during moderate-intensity constant work-rate cycling exercise (1.178 &plusmn; 0.141 vs. 1.269 &plusmn; 0.136 L&middot;min&minus;1); (b) a significantly higher total muscle work during fatiguing, intermittent sub-maximal isometric knee extension (357.3 &plusmn; 176.1 vs. 253.6 &plusmn; 149.0 Nm&middot;s&middot;kg&minus;1); (c) an improved performance in Repeated Sprint Ability test. These findings suggest that a high-nitrate diet could be a feasible and effective strategy to improve exercise performance.

No MeSH data available.