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Paternal High Fat Diet in Rats Leads to Renal Accumulation of Lipid and Tubular Changes in Adult Offspring

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Along with diabetes and obesity, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing across the globe. Although some data support an effect of maternal obesity on offspring kidney, the impact of paternal obesity is unknown; thus, we have studied the effect of paternal obesity prior to conception. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed chow diet or high fat diet (HFD) for 13–14 weeks before mating with chow-fed females. Male offspring were weaned onto chow and killed at 27 weeks for renal gene expression and histology. Fathers on HFD were 30% heavier than Controls at mating. At 27 weeks of age offspring of obese fathers weighed 10% less; kidney triglyceride content was significantly increased (5.35 ± 0.84 vs. 2.99 ± 0.47 μg/mg, p < 0.05, n = 8 litters per group. Histological analysis of the kidney demonstrated signs of tubule damage, with significantly greater loss of brush border, and increased cell sloughing in offspring of obese compared to Control fathers. Acat1, involved in entry of fatty acid for beta-oxidation, was significantly upregulated, possibly to counteract increased triglyceride storage. However other genes involved in lipid metabolism, inflammation and kidney injury showed no changes. Paternal obesity was associated with renal triglyceride accumulation and histological changes in tubules, suggesting a mild renal insult in offspring, who may be at risk of developing CKD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histological images of representative periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stained kidney sections (400×, scale bar represents 20 μm). PAS stained kidney sections of a rat from Control (left) and HFD (right) group showing greater evidence of missing or ruptured brush border (arrows) and cell sloughing inside the lumen (asterisk) in offspring of HFD fed fathers compared to Control.
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nutrients-08-00521-f001: Histological images of representative periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stained kidney sections (400×, scale bar represents 20 μm). PAS stained kidney sections of a rat from Control (left) and HFD (right) group showing greater evidence of missing or ruptured brush border (arrows) and cell sloughing inside the lumen (asterisk) in offspring of HFD fed fathers compared to Control.

Mentions: Histological analysis of PAS stained sections of five kidneys from five different fathers per group revealed evidence of increased tubular damage in the kidneys of offspring born to obese fathers. We observed a significant increase of cell sloughing inside the tubular lumen and ruptured brush border in tubules of offspring of HFD compared to Control fathers (Table 4, Figure 1). Kidney triglyceride content was significantly correlated with the degree of cell sloughing observed (r2 = 0.8145, p < 0.001). There was no difference in apoptotic cells and debris. No sclerosis or marked glomerular abnormalities were seen in any of the specimens.


Paternal High Fat Diet in Rats Leads to Renal Accumulation of Lipid and Tubular Changes in Adult Offspring
Histological images of representative periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stained kidney sections (400×, scale bar represents 20 μm). PAS stained kidney sections of a rat from Control (left) and HFD (right) group showing greater evidence of missing or ruptured brush border (arrows) and cell sloughing inside the lumen (asterisk) in offspring of HFD fed fathers compared to Control.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037508&req=5

nutrients-08-00521-f001: Histological images of representative periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stained kidney sections (400×, scale bar represents 20 μm). PAS stained kidney sections of a rat from Control (left) and HFD (right) group showing greater evidence of missing or ruptured brush border (arrows) and cell sloughing inside the lumen (asterisk) in offspring of HFD fed fathers compared to Control.
Mentions: Histological analysis of PAS stained sections of five kidneys from five different fathers per group revealed evidence of increased tubular damage in the kidneys of offspring born to obese fathers. We observed a significant increase of cell sloughing inside the tubular lumen and ruptured brush border in tubules of offspring of HFD compared to Control fathers (Table 4, Figure 1). Kidney triglyceride content was significantly correlated with the degree of cell sloughing observed (r2 = 0.8145, p < 0.001). There was no difference in apoptotic cells and debris. No sclerosis or marked glomerular abnormalities were seen in any of the specimens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Along with diabetes and obesity, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing across the globe. Although some data support an effect of maternal obesity on offspring kidney, the impact of paternal obesity is unknown; thus, we have studied the effect of paternal obesity prior to conception. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed chow diet or high fat diet (HFD) for 13&ndash;14 weeks before mating with chow-fed females. Male offspring were weaned onto chow and killed at 27 weeks for renal gene expression and histology. Fathers on HFD were 30% heavier than Controls at mating. At 27 weeks of age offspring of obese fathers weighed 10% less; kidney triglyceride content was significantly increased (5.35 &plusmn; 0.84 vs. 2.99 &plusmn; 0.47 &mu;g/mg, p &lt; 0.05, n = 8 litters per group. Histological analysis of the kidney demonstrated signs of tubule damage, with significantly greater loss of brush border, and increased cell sloughing in offspring of obese compared to Control fathers. Acat1, involved in entry of fatty acid for beta-oxidation, was significantly upregulated, possibly to counteract increased triglyceride storage. However other genes involved in lipid metabolism, inflammation and kidney injury showed no changes. Paternal obesity was associated with renal triglyceride accumulation and histological changes in tubules, suggesting a mild renal insult in offspring, who may be at risk of developing CKD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus