Limits...
Layer-specific femorotibial cartilage T2 relaxation time in knees with and without early knee osteoarthritis: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping has been shown to be associated with cartilage matrix composition (hydration, collagen content & orientation). To determine the impact of early radiographic knee osteoarthritis (ROA) and ROA risk factors on femorotibial cartilage composition, we studied baseline values and one-year change in superficial and deep cartilage T2 layers in 60 subjects (age 60.6 ± 9.6 y; BMI 27.8 ± 4.8) with definite osteophytes in one knee (earlyROA, n = 32) and with ROA risk factors in the contralateral knee (riskROA, n = 28), and 89 healthy subjects (age 55.0 ± 7.5 y; BMI 24.4 ± 3.1) without signs or risk factors of ROA. Baseline T2 did not differ significantly between earlyROA and riskROA knees in the superficial (48.0 ± 3.5 ms vs. 48.1 ± 3.1 ms) or the deep layer (37.3 ± 2.5 ms vs. 37.3 ± 1.8 ms). However, healthy knees showed significantly lower superficial layer T2 (45.4 ± 2.3 ms) than earlyROA or riskROA knees (p ≤ 0.001) and significantly lower deep layer T2 (35.8 ± 1.8 ms) than riskROA knees (p = 0.006). Significant longitudinal change in T2 (superficial: 0.5 ± 1.4 ms; deep: 0.8 ± 1.3 ms) was only detected in healthy knees. These results do not suggest an association of early ROA (osteophytes) with cartilage composition, as assessed by T2 mapping, whereas cartilage composition was observed to differ between knees with and without ROA risk factors.

No MeSH data available.


Sagittal multi-echo spin-echo (MESE) images showing the medial tibia (MT) and the medial femur (MF).(A–C) MESE images with the shortest (10 ms, A), an intermediate (40 ms, B), and the longest echo time (70 ms, C). (D) T2 map of the (medial) femorotibial cartilages, with values demonstrated by color coding. (E) T2 map showing the region of interest used to define the central, weight-bearing part of the MF (cMF). (F) T2 map showing the segmentation of the MT and the cMF.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037443&req=5

f1: Sagittal multi-echo spin-echo (MESE) images showing the medial tibia (MT) and the medial femur (MF).(A–C) MESE images with the shortest (10 ms, A), an intermediate (40 ms, B), and the longest echo time (70 ms, C). (D) T2 map of the (medial) femorotibial cartilages, with values demonstrated by color coding. (E) T2 map showing the region of interest used to define the central, weight-bearing part of the MF (cMF). (F) T2 map showing the segmentation of the MT and the cMF.

Mentions: Sagittal 3 Tesla multi-echo spin-echo (MESE) MR images were acquired for cartilage T2 analyses in one of the knees of all OAI participants (usually the right knee, Fig. 1)1819. The repetition time was 2700 ms, and the echo times were 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 ms (slice thickness 3.0 mm, in-plane resolution 0.3125 mm). All imaging parameters were kept constant between baseline and follow-up. Baseline MR images for one of the knees were available for 60 of the 61 participants and 1-year follow-up MR images were available for 50 of the 61 participants. In 32 participants, the MESE images (of the right knee) happened to be available for the knee with osteophytes (earlyROA); in 28 participants, the MESE images (of the right knee) happened to be available for the contralateral knee without osteophytes (riskROA). MESE images were available for all 92 healthy reference knees.


Layer-specific femorotibial cartilage T2 relaxation time in knees with and without early knee osteoarthritis: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI)
Sagittal multi-echo spin-echo (MESE) images showing the medial tibia (MT) and the medial femur (MF).(A–C) MESE images with the shortest (10 ms, A), an intermediate (40 ms, B), and the longest echo time (70 ms, C). (D) T2 map of the (medial) femorotibial cartilages, with values demonstrated by color coding. (E) T2 map showing the region of interest used to define the central, weight-bearing part of the MF (cMF). (F) T2 map showing the segmentation of the MT and the cMF.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037443&req=5

f1: Sagittal multi-echo spin-echo (MESE) images showing the medial tibia (MT) and the medial femur (MF).(A–C) MESE images with the shortest (10 ms, A), an intermediate (40 ms, B), and the longest echo time (70 ms, C). (D) T2 map of the (medial) femorotibial cartilages, with values demonstrated by color coding. (E) T2 map showing the region of interest used to define the central, weight-bearing part of the MF (cMF). (F) T2 map showing the segmentation of the MT and the cMF.
Mentions: Sagittal 3 Tesla multi-echo spin-echo (MESE) MR images were acquired for cartilage T2 analyses in one of the knees of all OAI participants (usually the right knee, Fig. 1)1819. The repetition time was 2700 ms, and the echo times were 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 ms (slice thickness 3.0 mm, in-plane resolution 0.3125 mm). All imaging parameters were kept constant between baseline and follow-up. Baseline MR images for one of the knees were available for 60 of the 61 participants and 1-year follow-up MR images were available for 50 of the 61 participants. In 32 participants, the MESE images (of the right knee) happened to be available for the knee with osteophytes (earlyROA); in 28 participants, the MESE images (of the right knee) happened to be available for the contralateral knee without osteophytes (riskROA). MESE images were available for all 92 healthy reference knees.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based spin-spin relaxation time (T2) mapping has been shown to be associated with cartilage matrix composition (hydration, collagen content & orientation). To determine the impact of early radiographic knee osteoarthritis (ROA) and ROA risk factors on femorotibial cartilage composition, we studied baseline values and one-year change in superficial and deep cartilage T2 layers in 60 subjects (age 60.6 ± 9.6 y; BMI 27.8 ± 4.8) with definite osteophytes in one knee (earlyROA, n = 32) and with ROA risk factors in the contralateral knee (riskROA, n = 28), and 89 healthy subjects (age 55.0 ± 7.5 y; BMI 24.4 ± 3.1) without signs or risk factors of ROA. Baseline T2 did not differ significantly between earlyROA and riskROA knees in the superficial (48.0 ± 3.5 ms vs. 48.1 ± 3.1 ms) or the deep layer (37.3 ± 2.5 ms vs. 37.3 ± 1.8 ms). However, healthy knees showed significantly lower superficial layer T2 (45.4 ± 2.3 ms) than earlyROA or riskROA knees (p ≤ 0.001) and significantly lower deep layer T2 (35.8 ± 1.8 ms) than riskROA knees (p = 0.006). Significant longitudinal change in T2 (superficial: 0.5 ± 1.4 ms; deep: 0.8 ± 1.3 ms) was only detected in healthy knees. These results do not suggest an association of early ROA (osteophytes) with cartilage composition, as assessed by T2 mapping, whereas cartilage composition was observed to differ between knees with and without ROA risk factors.

No MeSH data available.