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In-vivo, non-invasive detection of hyperglycemic states in animal models using mm-wave spectroscopy

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Chronic or sustained hyperglycemia associated to diabetes mellitus leads to many medical complications, thus, it is necessary to track the evolution of patients for providing the adequate management of the disease that is required for the restoration of the carbohydrate metabolism to a normal state. In this paper, a novel monitoring approach based on mm-wave spectroscopy is comprehensively described and experimentally validated using living animal models as target. The measurement method has proved the possibility of non-invasive, in-vivo, detection of hyperglycemia-associated conditions in different mouse models, making possible to clearly differentiate between several hyperglycemic states.

No MeSH data available.


Images of the folded mouse back skin setting used to measure the transmittance of each sample for a diabetized nude (left) and a control black (right) mice.
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f5: Images of the folded mouse back skin setting used to measure the transmittance of each sample for a diabetized nude (left) and a control black (right) mice.

Mentions: To ensure the non-invasive operation, all measurements were carried out on a fold of the skin of the mice (see Fig. 5), not harming the animals. A separation between waveguides of 800 μm was used as it was found to be the best compromise for having the length necessary to fix the skin during measurements, and not harming the mice. The measurement area of all hairy mice was shaved to ensure the consistency of the data obtained and to avoid the influence of possible external factors on the measurements. It is important to note here that, besides shaving the hairy animals, no previous treatment of the skin, or gel, is needed to perform the measurements.


In-vivo, non-invasive detection of hyperglycemic states in animal models using mm-wave spectroscopy
Images of the folded mouse back skin setting used to measure the transmittance of each sample for a diabetized nude (left) and a control black (right) mice.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037419&req=5

f5: Images of the folded mouse back skin setting used to measure the transmittance of each sample for a diabetized nude (left) and a control black (right) mice.
Mentions: To ensure the non-invasive operation, all measurements were carried out on a fold of the skin of the mice (see Fig. 5), not harming the animals. A separation between waveguides of 800 μm was used as it was found to be the best compromise for having the length necessary to fix the skin during measurements, and not harming the mice. The measurement area of all hairy mice was shaved to ensure the consistency of the data obtained and to avoid the influence of possible external factors on the measurements. It is important to note here that, besides shaving the hairy animals, no previous treatment of the skin, or gel, is needed to perform the measurements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Chronic or sustained hyperglycemia associated to diabetes mellitus leads to many medical complications, thus, it is necessary to track the evolution of patients for providing the adequate management of the disease that is required for the restoration of the carbohydrate metabolism to a normal state. In this paper, a novel monitoring approach based on mm-wave spectroscopy is comprehensively described and experimentally validated using living animal models as target. The measurement method has proved the possibility of non-invasive, in-vivo, detection of hyperglycemia-associated conditions in different mouse models, making possible to clearly differentiate between several hyperglycemic states.

No MeSH data available.