Limits...
In-vivo, non-invasive detection of hyperglycemic states in animal models using mm-wave spectroscopy

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Chronic or sustained hyperglycemia associated to diabetes mellitus leads to many medical complications, thus, it is necessary to track the evolution of patients for providing the adequate management of the disease that is required for the restoration of the carbohydrate metabolism to a normal state. In this paper, a novel monitoring approach based on mm-wave spectroscopy is comprehensively described and experimentally validated using living animal models as target. The measurement method has proved the possibility of non-invasive, in-vivo, detection of hyperglycemia-associated conditions in different mouse models, making possible to clearly differentiate between several hyperglycemic states.

No MeSH data available.


Amplitudes of the signals at the output of the receiver for the different types of mice.As the maximum standard deviation found in the measurements is below 2%, error bars have not been included.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037419&req=5

f2: Amplitudes of the signals at the output of the receiver for the different types of mice.As the maximum standard deviation found in the measurements is below 2%, error bars have not been included.

Mentions: The amplitudes of the signals transmitted through the folded skin for each animal model as a function of frequency are shown in Fig. 2. It is apparent how the transmittance of the skin of the group of animals with higher blood glucose levels is far higher than that of animals with normal glucose levels. It is clearly appreciated that the different strains of control normoglycemic animals (nude and hairy black and white mice) and the obese implanted with the leptin pump have a similar skin transmittance. On the other hand, obese and genetically and chemically diabetic mice, with a much lower absorbance, can be grouped together.


In-vivo, non-invasive detection of hyperglycemic states in animal models using mm-wave spectroscopy
Amplitudes of the signals at the output of the receiver for the different types of mice.As the maximum standard deviation found in the measurements is below 2%, error bars have not been included.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037419&req=5

f2: Amplitudes of the signals at the output of the receiver for the different types of mice.As the maximum standard deviation found in the measurements is below 2%, error bars have not been included.
Mentions: The amplitudes of the signals transmitted through the folded skin for each animal model as a function of frequency are shown in Fig. 2. It is apparent how the transmittance of the skin of the group of animals with higher blood glucose levels is far higher than that of animals with normal glucose levels. It is clearly appreciated that the different strains of control normoglycemic animals (nude and hairy black and white mice) and the obese implanted with the leptin pump have a similar skin transmittance. On the other hand, obese and genetically and chemically diabetic mice, with a much lower absorbance, can be grouped together.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Chronic or sustained hyperglycemia associated to diabetes mellitus leads to many medical complications, thus, it is necessary to track the evolution of patients for providing the adequate management of the disease that is required for the restoration of the carbohydrate metabolism to a normal state. In this paper, a novel monitoring approach based on mm-wave spectroscopy is comprehensively described and experimentally validated using living animal models as target. The measurement method has proved the possibility of non-invasive, in-vivo, detection of hyperglycemia-associated conditions in different mouse models, making possible to clearly differentiate between several hyperglycemic states.

No MeSH data available.