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Gene expression profiling reveals aryl hydrocarbon receptor as a possible target for photobiomodulation when using blue light

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ABSTRACT

Photobiomodulation (PBM) with blue light induces a biphasic dose response curve in proliferation of immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT), with a maximum anti-proliferative effect reached with 30min (41.4 J/cm2). The aim of this study was to test the photobiomodulatory effect of 41.4 J/cm2 blue light irradiation on ROS production, apoptosis and gene expression at different time points after irradiation of HaCaT cells in vitro and assess its safety. ROS concentration was increased 30 min after irradiation. However, already 1 h after irradiation, cells were able to reduce ROS and balance the concentration to a normal level. The sudden increase in ROS did not damage the cells, which was demonstrated with FACS analysis where HaCaT cells did not show any sign of apoptosis after blue light irradiation. Furthermore, a time course could be seen in gene expression analysis after blue light, with an early response of stimulated genes already 1 h after blue light irradiation, leading to the discovery of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor as possible target for blue light irradiation.

No MeSH data available.


ROS measurement – blue light induces a rapid increase of H2O2 in human keratinocytes, which is balanced out by the cells within 24 h.
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f1: ROS measurement – blue light induces a rapid increase of H2O2 in human keratinocytes, which is balanced out by the cells within 24 h.

Mentions: As light is known to induce production of ROS, respectively H2O2, we measured H2O2 concentrations in HaCaT cells at different time points after 30 min of blue light irradiation, with a first time point at 30 min according to incubation time. H2O2 concentration was increased 1.26 fold (by 26%) 30 min after blue light irradiation (p < 0.0001*). Followed by a decrease of 7% 1 h (p < 0.0001*) after irradiation, H2O2 concentration alternated between a decrease of 1% after 3 h (p = 0.7585) to 4% after 6 h (p < 0.0001*) and finally increase of 5% after 24 h (p < 0.0001*) (Fig. 1).


Gene expression profiling reveals aryl hydrocarbon receptor as a possible target for photobiomodulation when using blue light
ROS measurement – blue light induces a rapid increase of H2O2 in human keratinocytes, which is balanced out by the cells within 24 h.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037386&req=5

f1: ROS measurement – blue light induces a rapid increase of H2O2 in human keratinocytes, which is balanced out by the cells within 24 h.
Mentions: As light is known to induce production of ROS, respectively H2O2, we measured H2O2 concentrations in HaCaT cells at different time points after 30 min of blue light irradiation, with a first time point at 30 min according to incubation time. H2O2 concentration was increased 1.26 fold (by 26%) 30 min after blue light irradiation (p < 0.0001*). Followed by a decrease of 7% 1 h (p < 0.0001*) after irradiation, H2O2 concentration alternated between a decrease of 1% after 3 h (p = 0.7585) to 4% after 6 h (p < 0.0001*) and finally increase of 5% after 24 h (p < 0.0001*) (Fig. 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Photobiomodulation (PBM) with blue light induces a biphasic dose response curve in proliferation of immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT), with a maximum anti-proliferative effect reached with 30min (41.4&thinsp;J/cm2). The aim of this study was to test the photobiomodulatory effect of 41.4&thinsp;J/cm2 blue light irradiation on ROS production, apoptosis and gene expression at different time points after irradiation of HaCaT cells in vitro and assess its safety. ROS concentration was increased 30&thinsp;min after irradiation. However, already 1&thinsp;h after irradiation, cells were able to reduce ROS and balance the concentration to a normal level. The sudden increase in ROS did not damage the cells, which was demonstrated with FACS analysis where HaCaT cells did not show any sign of apoptosis after blue light irradiation. Furthermore, a time course could be seen in gene expression analysis after blue light, with an early response of stimulated genes already 1&thinsp;h after blue light irradiation, leading to the discovery of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor as possible target for blue light irradiation.

No MeSH data available.