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Acquisition of natural humoral immunity to P. falciparum in early life in Benin: impact of clinical, environmental and host factors

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ABSTRACT

To our knowledge, effects of age, placental malaria infection, infections during follow-up, nutritional habits, sickle-cell trait and individual exposure to Anopheles bites were never explored together in a study focusing on the acquisition of malaria antibody responses among infants living in endemic areas.Five hundred and sixty-seven Beninese infants were weekly followed-up from birth to 18 months of age. Immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgG1 and IgG3 specific for 5 malaria antigens were measured every 3 months. A linear mixed model was used to analyze the effect of each variable on the acquisition of antimalarial antibodies in 6-to18-month old infants in univariate and multivariate analyses. Placental malaria, nutrition intakes and sickle-cell trait did not influence the infant antibody levels to P. falciparum antigens. In contrary, age, malaria antibody levels at birth, previous and present malaria infections as well as exposure to Anopheles bites were significantly associated with the natural acquisition of malaria antibodies in 6-to18-month old Beninese infants. This study highlighted inescapable factors to consider simultaneously in an immuno-epidemiological study or a vaccine trial in early life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Acquisition of IgG to malaria blood stage antigens for infant with one malaria infection during the follow-up: effect of age (A): infants with no malaria infection. Each B-to-E panel concerns distinct children selected on the basis of their first (and only one) malaria infection that occurred either between (B) 6–9 months of age or (C) 9–12 months of age or (D) 12–15 months of age or (E) 15–18 months of age; n: number of infants in each group.
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f2: Acquisition of IgG to malaria blood stage antigens for infant with one malaria infection during the follow-up: effect of age (A): infants with no malaria infection. Each B-to-E panel concerns distinct children selected on the basis of their first (and only one) malaria infection that occurred either between (B) 6–9 months of age or (C) 9–12 months of age or (D) 12–15 months of age or (E) 15–18 months of age; n: number of infants in each group.

Mentions: The results presented in the Figs 1, 2 and 3 showed the raw data of IgG, IgG1 and IgG3 acquired in concentration (μg/mL) without statistical test associated.


Acquisition of natural humoral immunity to P. falciparum in early life in Benin: impact of clinical, environmental and host factors
Acquisition of IgG to malaria blood stage antigens for infant with one malaria infection during the follow-up: effect of age (A): infants with no malaria infection. Each B-to-E panel concerns distinct children selected on the basis of their first (and only one) malaria infection that occurred either between (B) 6–9 months of age or (C) 9–12 months of age or (D) 12–15 months of age or (E) 15–18 months of age; n: number of infants in each group.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037375&req=5

f2: Acquisition of IgG to malaria blood stage antigens for infant with one malaria infection during the follow-up: effect of age (A): infants with no malaria infection. Each B-to-E panel concerns distinct children selected on the basis of their first (and only one) malaria infection that occurred either between (B) 6–9 months of age or (C) 9–12 months of age or (D) 12–15 months of age or (E) 15–18 months of age; n: number of infants in each group.
Mentions: The results presented in the Figs 1, 2 and 3 showed the raw data of IgG, IgG1 and IgG3 acquired in concentration (μg/mL) without statistical test associated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

To our knowledge, effects of age, placental malaria infection, infections during follow-up, nutritional habits, sickle-cell trait and individual exposure to Anopheles bites were never explored together in a study focusing on the acquisition of malaria antibody responses among infants living in endemic areas.Five hundred and sixty-seven Beninese infants were weekly followed-up from birth to 18 months of age. Immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgG1 and IgG3 specific for 5 malaria antigens were measured every 3 months. A linear mixed model was used to analyze the effect of each variable on the acquisition of antimalarial antibodies in 6-to18-month old infants in univariate and multivariate analyses. Placental malaria, nutrition intakes and sickle-cell trait did not influence the infant antibody levels to P. falciparum antigens. In contrary, age, malaria antibody levels at birth, previous and present malaria infections as well as exposure to Anopheles bites were significantly associated with the natural acquisition of malaria antibodies in 6-to18-month old Beninese infants. This study highlighted inescapable factors to consider simultaneously in an immuno-epidemiological study or a vaccine trial in early life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus