Limits...
Plague in Iran: its history and current status

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objectives:: Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, particularly in old foci. Multiple epidemics of this disease have been recorded throughout the history of Iran. Despite the long-standing history of human plague in Iran, it remains difficult to obtain an accurate overview of the history and current status of plague in Iran.

Methods:: In this review, available data and reports on cases and outbreaks of human plague in the past and present in Iran and in neighboring countries were collected, and information was compiled regarding when, where, and how many cases occurred.

Results:: This paper considers the history of plague in Persia (the predecessor of today’s Iran) and has a brief review of plague in countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region, including a range of countries in the Middle East and North Africa.

Conclusions:: Since Iran has experienced outbreaks of plague for several centuries, neighboring countries have reported the disease in recent years, the disease can be silent for decades, and the circulation of Yersinia pestis has been reported among rodents and dogs in western Iran, more attention should be paid to disease monitoring in areas with previously reported human cases and in high-risk regions with previous epizootic and enzootic activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region affected by plague.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037359&req=5

f2-epih-38-e2016033: Countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region affected by plague.

Mentions: Roughly over the past century, plague outbreaks have been seen in at least 14 countries in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region in the Middle East and North Africa (Figure 2); all of these, as well as many earlier outbreaks, are briefly reviewed below.


Plague in Iran: its history and current status
Countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region affected by plague.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037359&req=5

f2-epih-38-e2016033: Countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region affected by plague.
Mentions: Roughly over the past century, plague outbreaks have been seen in at least 14 countries in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region in the Middle East and North Africa (Figure 2); all of these, as well as many earlier outbreaks, are briefly reviewed below.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Objectives:: Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, particularly in old foci. Multiple epidemics of this disease have been recorded throughout the history of Iran. Despite the long-standing history of human plague in Iran, it remains difficult to obtain an accurate overview of the history and current status of plague in Iran.

Methods:: In this review, available data and reports on cases and outbreaks of human plague in the past and present in Iran and in neighboring countries were collected, and information was compiled regarding when, where, and how many cases occurred.

Results:: This paper considers the history of plague in Persia (the predecessor of today’s Iran) and has a brief review of plague in countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region, including a range of countries in the Middle East and North Africa.

Conclusions:: Since Iran has experienced outbreaks of plague for several centuries, neighboring countries have reported the disease in recent years, the disease can be silent for decades, and the circulation of Yersinia pestis has been reported among rodents and dogs in western Iran, more attention should be paid to disease monitoring in areas with previously reported human cases and in high-risk regions with previous epizootic and enzootic activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus