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Ohio solid organ transplantation consortium criteria for liver transplantation in patients with alcoholic liver disease

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate risk of recidivism on a case-by-case basis.

Methods: From our center’s liver transplant program, we selected patients with alcoholic liver disease who were listed for transplant based on Ohio Solid Organ Transplantation Consortium (OSOTC) exception criteria. They were considered to have either a low or medium risk of recidivism, and had at least one or three or more months of abstinence, respectively. They were matched based on gender, age, and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to controls with alcohol-induced cirrhosis from Organ Procurement and Transplant Network data.

Results: Thirty six patients with alcoholic liver disease were approved for listing based on OSOTC exception criteria and were matched to 72 controls. Nineteen patients (53%) with a median [Inter-quartile range (IQR)] MELD score of 24 (13) received transplant and were followed for a median of 3.4 years. They were matched to 38 controls with a median (IQR) MELD score of 25 (9). At one and five years, cumulative survival rates (± standard error) were 90% ± 7% and 92% ± 5% and 73% ± 12% and 77% ± 8% in patients and controls, respectively (Log-rank test, P = 0.837). Four (21%) patients resumed drinking by last follow-up visit.

Conclusion: Compared to traditional criteria for assessment of risk of recidivism, a careful selection process with more flexibility to evaluate eligibility on a case-by-case basis can lead to similar survival rates after transplantation.

No MeSH data available.


Kaplan-meier estimates of survival after liver transplant in the 19 study patients and the 38 matched controls.
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Figure 2: Kaplan-meier estimates of survival after liver transplant in the 19 study patients and the 38 matched controls.

Mentions: Both patients and controls had a median follow-up of more than three years after transplant (Table 3). One year after transplant 90% ± 7% of patients were alive compared with 92% ± 5% of controls. At five years, 73% ± 12% of patients was still alive compared with 77% ± 8% of controls (Figure 2). Survival rates after transplant did not differ significantly between patients and controls (log rank test, P-value = 0.837).


Ohio solid organ transplantation consortium criteria for liver transplantation in patients with alcoholic liver disease
Kaplan-meier estimates of survival after liver transplant in the 19 study patients and the 38 matched controls.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037328&req=5

Figure 2: Kaplan-meier estimates of survival after liver transplant in the 19 study patients and the 38 matched controls.
Mentions: Both patients and controls had a median follow-up of more than three years after transplant (Table 3). One year after transplant 90% ± 7% of patients were alive compared with 92% ± 5% of controls. At five years, 73% ± 12% of patients was still alive compared with 77% ± 8% of controls (Figure 2). Survival rates after transplant did not differ significantly between patients and controls (log rank test, P-value = 0.837).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate risk of recidivism on a case-by-case basis.

Methods: From our center’s liver transplant program, we selected patients with alcoholic liver disease who were listed for transplant based on Ohio Solid Organ Transplantation Consortium (OSOTC) exception criteria. They were considered to have either a low or medium risk of recidivism, and had at least one or three or more months of abstinence, respectively. They were matched based on gender, age, and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to controls with alcohol-induced cirrhosis from Organ Procurement and Transplant Network data.

Results: Thirty six patients with alcoholic liver disease were approved for listing based on OSOTC exception criteria and were matched to 72 controls. Nineteen patients (53%) with a median [Inter-quartile range (IQR)] MELD score of 24 (13) received transplant and were followed for a median of 3.4 years. They were matched to 38 controls with a median (IQR) MELD score of 25 (9). At one and five years, cumulative survival rates (± standard error) were 90% ± 7% and 92% ± 5% and 73% ± 12% and 77% ± 8% in patients and controls, respectively (Log-rank test, P = 0.837). Four (21%) patients resumed drinking by last follow-up visit.

Conclusion: Compared to traditional criteria for assessment of risk of recidivism, a careful selection process with more flexibility to evaluate eligibility on a case-by-case basis can lead to similar survival rates after transplantation.

No MeSH data available.