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Hyperammonemic hepatic encephalopathy management through L-ornithin-L-aspartate administration in dogs

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Seventeen dogs were treated with L-ornithin-L-aspartate (LOLA; experimental group). Three dogs were treated with lactulose recognized therapy (control group). Following LOLA administration, 15 dogs experienced a significant decrease in ammonia level (p < 0.05) and showed clinical signs of improvement. However, there were no clinical signs of improvement in two dogs, even though the ammonia level decreased. Conversely, the clinical signs of the control group also improved and the ammonia level decreased, although these changes were not significant (p > 0.05). These results suggest that LOLA is an effective drug to treat hyperammonemia in veterinary medicine.

No MeSH data available.


Changes in ammonemia level before and after L-ornithine-L-aspartate (LOLA) intravenous administration in dogs with severe HE and mild HE (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01).
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Figure 1: Changes in ammonemia level before and after L-ornithine-L-aspartate (LOLA) intravenous administration in dogs with severe HE and mild HE (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01).

Mentions: With LOLA intravenous administration, the level of ammonemia decreased and the clinical signs of severe HE improved from grade III or IV to grade 0 or I. The level of ammonemia in seven dogs with mild HE also decreased and the clinical signs improved from grade I to grade 0. At 24 h after LOLA administration, the ammonemia level decreased with statistical significance in both mild HE and severe HE (mild HE, p < 0.05; severe HE, p < 0.01) (Fig. 1). However, there were no clinical signs of improvement in the two dogs with mild HE occurring from acute liver failure and portosystemic shunt, even though the ammonemia level decreased. With LOLA administration, there were no obvious side effects secondary to administration. On the other hand, all animals in the control group suffered from severe HE. Following lactulose administration, the clinical signs of this group also improved from grade IV to grade I or II and the ammonia level decreased, although this decrease was not statistically significant (p > 0.05).


Hyperammonemic hepatic encephalopathy management through L-ornithin-L-aspartate administration in dogs
Changes in ammonemia level before and after L-ornithine-L-aspartate (LOLA) intravenous administration in dogs with severe HE and mild HE (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037314&req=5

Figure 1: Changes in ammonemia level before and after L-ornithine-L-aspartate (LOLA) intravenous administration in dogs with severe HE and mild HE (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01).
Mentions: With LOLA intravenous administration, the level of ammonemia decreased and the clinical signs of severe HE improved from grade III or IV to grade 0 or I. The level of ammonemia in seven dogs with mild HE also decreased and the clinical signs improved from grade I to grade 0. At 24 h after LOLA administration, the ammonemia level decreased with statistical significance in both mild HE and severe HE (mild HE, p < 0.05; severe HE, p < 0.01) (Fig. 1). However, there were no clinical signs of improvement in the two dogs with mild HE occurring from acute liver failure and portosystemic shunt, even though the ammonemia level decreased. With LOLA administration, there were no obvious side effects secondary to administration. On the other hand, all animals in the control group suffered from severe HE. Following lactulose administration, the clinical signs of this group also improved from grade IV to grade I or II and the ammonia level decreased, although this decrease was not statistically significant (p > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Seventeen dogs were treated with L-ornithin-L-aspartate (LOLA; experimental group). Three dogs were treated with lactulose recognized therapy (control group). Following LOLA administration, 15 dogs experienced a significant decrease in ammonia level (p &lt; 0.05) and showed clinical signs of improvement. However, there were no clinical signs of improvement in two dogs, even though the ammonia level decreased. Conversely, the clinical signs of the control group also improved and the ammonia level decreased, although these changes were not significant (p &gt; 0.05). These results suggest that LOLA is an effective drug to treat hyperammonemia in veterinary medicine.

No MeSH data available.