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Reproductive ability of a cloned male detector dog and behavioral traits of its offspring

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In 2007, seven detector dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer using one nuclear donor dog, then trained and certified as excellent detector dogs, similar to their donor. In 2011, we crossed a cloned male and normal female by natural breeding and produced ten offspring. In this study, we investigated the puppies' temperaments, which we later compared with those of the cloned parent male. The results show that the cloned male had normal reproductive abilities and produced healthy offspring. All puppies completed narcotic detector dog training with a success rate for selection of 60%. Although the litter of cloned males was small in this study, a cloned male dog bred by natural mating produced puppies that later successfully completed the training course for drug detection. In conclusion, cloning an elite dog with superior genetic factors and breeding of the cloned dog was found to be a useful method to efficiently procure detector dogs.

No MeSH data available.


Mature appearance of F1 (P1–P10) produced by breeding a male cloned dog and a female dog. F1 developed without health problems until the end of training course. The image was taken at 2 years of age.
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Figure 2: Mature appearance of F1 (P1–P10) produced by breeding a male cloned dog and a female dog. F1 developed without health problems until the end of training course. The image was taken at 2 years of age.

Mentions: Natural breeding was performed to evaluate the fertility of the cloned male dog. At 61 days after mating, ten offspring (male: 5, female: 5) were born by natural delivery (Table 1; Fig. 1). The puppies were healthy, had a yellow coat color, and no abnormalities in morphology (Table 1; Fig. 2).


Reproductive ability of a cloned male detector dog and behavioral traits of its offspring
Mature appearance of F1 (P1–P10) produced by breeding a male cloned dog and a female dog. F1 developed without health problems until the end of training course. The image was taken at 2 years of age.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037310&req=5

Figure 2: Mature appearance of F1 (P1–P10) produced by breeding a male cloned dog and a female dog. F1 developed without health problems until the end of training course. The image was taken at 2 years of age.
Mentions: Natural breeding was performed to evaluate the fertility of the cloned male dog. At 61 days after mating, ten offspring (male: 5, female: 5) were born by natural delivery (Table 1; Fig. 1). The puppies were healthy, had a yellow coat color, and no abnormalities in morphology (Table 1; Fig. 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

In 2007, seven detector dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer using one nuclear donor dog, then trained and certified as excellent detector dogs, similar to their donor. In 2011, we crossed a cloned male and normal female by natural breeding and produced ten offspring. In this study, we investigated the puppies' temperaments, which we later compared with those of the cloned parent male. The results show that the cloned male had normal reproductive abilities and produced healthy offspring. All puppies completed narcotic detector dog training with a success rate for selection of 60%. Although the litter of cloned males was small in this study, a cloned male dog bred by natural mating produced puppies that later successfully completed the training course for drug detection. In conclusion, cloning an elite dog with superior genetic factors and breeding of the cloned dog was found to be a useful method to efficiently procure detector dogs.

No MeSH data available.