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Tick-borne rickettsial pathogens in questing ticks, removed from humans and animals in Mexico

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Tick-borne rickettsial diseases (TBRD) are commonly encountered in medical and veterinary clinical settings. The control of these diseases is difficult, requiring disruption of a complex transmission chain involving a vertebrate host and ticks. The geographical distribution of the diseases is related to distribution of the vector, which is an indicator of risk for the population. A total of 1,107 ticks were collected by tick dragging from forests, ecotourism parks and hosts at 101 sites in 22 of the 32 states of Mexico. Collected ticks were placed in 1.5 mL cryovials containing 70% ethanol and were identified to species. Ticks were pooled according to location/host of collection, date of collection, sex, and stage of development. A total of 51 ticks were assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to confirm species identification using morphological methods. A total of 477 pools of ticks were assayed using PCR techniques for selected tick-borne pathogens. Anaplasma phagocytophilum was the most commonly detected pathogen (45 pools), followed by, Ehrlichia (E.) canis (42), Rickettsia (R.) rickettsii (11), E. chaffeensis (8), and R. amblyommii (1). Rhipicephalus sanguineus was the tick most frequently positive for selected pathogens. Overall, our results indicate that potential tick vectors positive for rickettsial pathogens are distributed throughout the area surveyed in Mexico.

No MeSH data available.


Distribution of selected tick-borne pathogens detected by PCR in ticks collected via tick drag and from human and animal hosts in Mexico.
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Figure 2: Distribution of selected tick-borne pathogens detected by PCR in ticks collected via tick drag and from human and animal hosts in Mexico.

Mentions: A phylogenetic tree that included the selected tick-borne pathogens was constructed (Fig. 2). A map depicting the distribution of selected tick-borne pathogens detected by PCR from ticks collected by tick drag, humans and wild/domestic animals is shown in Fig. 3. A. phagocytophilum was the most frequent tick infection in the northwest (Table 3). We also identified the following associations: A. phagocytophilum infecting Amblyomma cajennense, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma maculatum and D. variabilis; E. canis infecting Amblyomma cajennense, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma maculatum, I. scapularis and H. leporis-palustris; R. rickettsii infecting D. nitens; and E. chaffeensis infecting Amblyomma cajennense.


Tick-borne rickettsial pathogens in questing ticks, removed from humans and animals in Mexico
Distribution of selected tick-borne pathogens detected by PCR in ticks collected via tick drag and from human and animal hosts in Mexico.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037303&req=5

Figure 2: Distribution of selected tick-borne pathogens detected by PCR in ticks collected via tick drag and from human and animal hosts in Mexico.
Mentions: A phylogenetic tree that included the selected tick-borne pathogens was constructed (Fig. 2). A map depicting the distribution of selected tick-borne pathogens detected by PCR from ticks collected by tick drag, humans and wild/domestic animals is shown in Fig. 3. A. phagocytophilum was the most frequent tick infection in the northwest (Table 3). We also identified the following associations: A. phagocytophilum infecting Amblyomma cajennense, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma maculatum and D. variabilis; E. canis infecting Amblyomma cajennense, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma maculatum, I. scapularis and H. leporis-palustris; R. rickettsii infecting D. nitens; and E. chaffeensis infecting Amblyomma cajennense.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Tick-borne rickettsial diseases (TBRD) are commonly encountered in medical and veterinary clinical settings. The control of these diseases is difficult, requiring disruption of a complex transmission chain involving a vertebrate host and ticks. The geographical distribution of the diseases is related to distribution of the vector, which is an indicator of risk for the population. A total of 1,107 ticks were collected by tick dragging from forests, ecotourism parks and hosts at 101 sites in 22 of the 32 states of Mexico. Collected ticks were placed in 1.5 mL cryovials containing 70% ethanol and were identified to species. Ticks were pooled according to location/host of collection, date of collection, sex, and stage of development. A total of 51 ticks were assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to confirm species identification using morphological methods. A total of 477 pools of ticks were assayed using PCR techniques for selected tick-borne pathogens. Anaplasma phagocytophilum was the most commonly detected pathogen (45 pools), followed by, Ehrlichia (E.) canis (42), Rickettsia (R.) rickettsii (11), E. chaffeensis (8), and R. amblyommii (1). Rhipicephalus sanguineus was the tick most frequently positive for selected pathogens. Overall, our results indicate that potential tick vectors positive for rickettsial pathogens are distributed throughout the area surveyed in Mexico.

No MeSH data available.