Limits...
Retrospective study of the clinical effects of acupuncture on cervical neurological diseases in dogs

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to evaluate new acupuncture protocols for the clinical treatment of cervical spinal cord diseases in 19 dogs. Three treatment options containing Jing-jiaji (cervical jiaji) were developed to treat neck pain, hemiparesis, and tetraparesis depending on the severity. The interval between the neurological disease onset and treatment (duration of signs), time to improvement after treatment, and recovery time were compared in dogs by body weight, age, and dry needle acupuncture (AP) with or without electro-AP (EAP). The duration of signs was longer in dogs weighing greater than 10 kg than in those weighing less than 10 kg (p < 0.05). Improvement and recovery times did not vary by body weight. Additionally, improvement and recovery times did not vary by age. The improvement and recovery times were longer in the AP+EAP group than the AP group (p < 0.05). Acupuncture with Jing-jiaji was effective in cervical spinal cord diseases in different sized dogs and in middle-aged and senior dogs. This report standardized AP treatment containing Jing-jiaji for canine cervical problems and evaluated its effects. The newly standardized AP methodology offers clinical practitioners an effective way to improve the outcomes of cervical neurological diseases in dogs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Locations of acupoints used for cervical spinal cord diseases in dogs. JJJ (Jing-jiaji) acupoints are located bilaterally on the neck. LI4 (He Gu) acupoints are located on dorsal fore paws. SI3 (Hou Xi) acupoints are positioned on lateral fore paws. LIV3 (Tai Chong) acupoints are situated on dorsal hind paws. BL11 (Da Zhu) acupoints are found on the front back area, and TH5 (Wai Guan) acupoints are located on the forearms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037301&req=5

Figure 1: Locations of acupoints used for cervical spinal cord diseases in dogs. JJJ (Jing-jiaji) acupoints are located bilaterally on the neck. LI4 (He Gu) acupoints are located on dorsal fore paws. SI3 (Hou Xi) acupoints are positioned on lateral fore paws. LIV3 (Tai Chong) acupoints are situated on dorsal hind paws. BL11 (Da Zhu) acupoints are found on the front back area, and TH5 (Wai Guan) acupoints are located on the forearms.

Mentions: The selected acupoints were divided into local points and distant points. Local points involved Jing-jiaji (JJJ, cervical jiaji) points. Distant points included LI4 (He Gu), SI3 (Hou Xi), LIV3 (Tai Chong), BL11 (Da Zhu), and TH5 (Wai Guan) (Table 1, Fig. 1).


Retrospective study of the clinical effects of acupuncture on cervical neurological diseases in dogs
Locations of acupoints used for cervical spinal cord diseases in dogs. JJJ (Jing-jiaji) acupoints are located bilaterally on the neck. LI4 (He Gu) acupoints are located on dorsal fore paws. SI3 (Hou Xi) acupoints are positioned on lateral fore paws. LIV3 (Tai Chong) acupoints are situated on dorsal hind paws. BL11 (Da Zhu) acupoints are found on the front back area, and TH5 (Wai Guan) acupoints are located on the forearms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037301&req=5

Figure 1: Locations of acupoints used for cervical spinal cord diseases in dogs. JJJ (Jing-jiaji) acupoints are located bilaterally on the neck. LI4 (He Gu) acupoints are located on dorsal fore paws. SI3 (Hou Xi) acupoints are positioned on lateral fore paws. LIV3 (Tai Chong) acupoints are situated on dorsal hind paws. BL11 (Da Zhu) acupoints are found on the front back area, and TH5 (Wai Guan) acupoints are located on the forearms.
Mentions: The selected acupoints were divided into local points and distant points. Local points involved Jing-jiaji (JJJ, cervical jiaji) points. Distant points included LI4 (He Gu), SI3 (Hou Xi), LIV3 (Tai Chong), BL11 (Da Zhu), and TH5 (Wai Guan) (Table 1, Fig. 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to evaluate new acupuncture protocols for the clinical treatment of cervical spinal cord diseases in 19 dogs. Three treatment options containing Jing-jiaji (cervical jiaji) were developed to treat neck pain, hemiparesis, and tetraparesis depending on the severity. The interval between the neurological disease onset and treatment (duration of signs), time to improvement after treatment, and recovery time were compared in dogs by body weight, age, and dry needle acupuncture (AP) with or without electro-AP (EAP). The duration of signs was longer in dogs weighing greater than 10 kg than in those weighing less than 10 kg (p < 0.05). Improvement and recovery times did not vary by body weight. Additionally, improvement and recovery times did not vary by age. The improvement and recovery times were longer in the AP+EAP group than the AP group (p < 0.05). Acupuncture with Jing-jiaji was effective in cervical spinal cord diseases in different sized dogs and in middle-aged and senior dogs. This report standardized AP treatment containing Jing-jiaji for canine cervical problems and evaluated its effects. The newly standardized AP methodology offers clinical practitioners an effective way to improve the outcomes of cervical neurological diseases in dogs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus