Limits...
Transgenesis for pig models

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Animal models, particularly pigs, have come to play an important role in translational biomedical research. There have been many pig models with genetically modifications via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, because most transgenic pigs have been produced by random integration to date, the necessity for more exact gene-mutated models using recombinase based conditional gene expression like mice has been raised. Currently, advanced genome-editing technologies enable us to generate specific gene-deleted and -inserted pig models. In the future, the development of pig models with gene editing technologies could be a valuable resource for biomedical research.

No MeSH data available.


Illustration of the deletion of a specific gene in the endogenous gene (CMAH) in the porcine cell line. Cas9 and sgRNA were transfected into porcine fibroblasts and mutations were analyzed by T7E1 assay and sequencing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037292&req=5

Figure 5: Illustration of the deletion of a specific gene in the endogenous gene (CMAH) in the porcine cell line. Cas9 and sgRNA were transfected into porcine fibroblasts and mutations were analyzed by T7E1 assay and sequencing.

Mentions: Watanabe et al. [36] were the first to report that ZFN efficiently deleted the exogenous eGFP gene from porcine somatic cells. Subsequently, the bi-allelic KO of endogenous genes (GGTA1 and CMAH) was efficiently disrupted in somatic cells. Those cells then produced KO piglets via SCNT [1217]. Even though ZFN could be efficiently applied to produce KO pigs, this technique has several disadvantages, including toxicity and off-target events [28]. Another genome-editing technology, DNA endonuclease (TALEN) and CRISPR-Cas9, has recently emerged, and it has functioned efficiently (Fig. 5). These methods have also been used to rapidly produce many KO pigs [3339]. It is expected that increasing numbers of KO and KI pigs will be produced in the near future.


Transgenesis for pig models
Illustration of the deletion of a specific gene in the endogenous gene (CMAH) in the porcine cell line. Cas9 and sgRNA were transfected into porcine fibroblasts and mutations were analyzed by T7E1 assay and sequencing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037292&req=5

Figure 5: Illustration of the deletion of a specific gene in the endogenous gene (CMAH) in the porcine cell line. Cas9 and sgRNA were transfected into porcine fibroblasts and mutations were analyzed by T7E1 assay and sequencing.
Mentions: Watanabe et al. [36] were the first to report that ZFN efficiently deleted the exogenous eGFP gene from porcine somatic cells. Subsequently, the bi-allelic KO of endogenous genes (GGTA1 and CMAH) was efficiently disrupted in somatic cells. Those cells then produced KO piglets via SCNT [1217]. Even though ZFN could be efficiently applied to produce KO pigs, this technique has several disadvantages, including toxicity and off-target events [28]. Another genome-editing technology, DNA endonuclease (TALEN) and CRISPR-Cas9, has recently emerged, and it has functioned efficiently (Fig. 5). These methods have also been used to rapidly produce many KO pigs [3339]. It is expected that increasing numbers of KO and KI pigs will be produced in the near future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Animal models, particularly pigs, have come to play an important role in translational biomedical research. There have been many pig models with genetically modifications via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, because most transgenic pigs have been produced by random integration to date, the necessity for more exact gene-mutated models using recombinase based conditional gene expression like mice has been raised. Currently, advanced genome-editing technologies enable us to generate specific gene-deleted and -inserted pig models. In the future, the development of pig models with gene editing technologies could be a valuable resource for biomedical research.

No MeSH data available.