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Performance of Language-Coordinated Collective Systems: A Study of Wine Recognition and Description

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Most of our perceptions of and engagements with the world are shaped by our immersion in social interactions, cultural traditions, tools and linguistic categories. In this study we experimentally investigate the impact of two types of language-based coordination on the recognition and description of complex sensory stimuli: that of red wine. Participants were asked to taste, remember and successively recognize samples of wines within a larger set in a two-by-two experimental design: (1) either individually or in pairs, and (2) with or without the support of a sommelier card—a cultural linguistic tool designed for wine description. Both effectiveness of recognition and the kinds of errors in the four conditions were analyzed. While our experimental manipulations did not impact recognition accuracy, bias-variance decomposition of error revealed non-trivial differences in how participants solved the task. Pairs generally displayed reduced bias and increased variance compared to individuals, however the variance dropped significantly when they used the sommelier card. The effect of sommelier card reducing the variance was observed only in pairs, individuals did not seem to benefit from the cultural linguistic tool. Analysis of descriptions generated with the aid of sommelier cards shows that pairs were more coherent and discriminative than individuals. The findings are discussed in terms of global properties and dynamics of collective systems when constrained by different types of cultural practices.

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Dispersion of filled sommelier cards after rank normalization and transformation with PCA (Principal Component Analysis). Gray lines denote logistic regression decision boundary, the model accuracy is reported below.
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Figure 3: Dispersion of filled sommelier cards after rank normalization and transformation with PCA (Principal Component Analysis). Gray lines denote logistic regression decision boundary, the model accuracy is reported below.

Mentions: Figure 3 shows dispersion of wine descriptions after rank normalization and dimensionality reduction through PCA. We applied a simple multinomial logistic regression model to look for regularities in the data. The independent variables were top two principal components, the dependent variable was either wine label or experimental condition. We observe a clear difference between descriptions of individuals and pairs (accuracy 0.43 vs. accuracy 0.6), which means that those prepared by pairs are more discriminative.


Performance of Language-Coordinated Collective Systems: A Study of Wine Recognition and Description
Dispersion of filled sommelier cards after rank normalization and transformation with PCA (Principal Component Analysis). Gray lines denote logistic regression decision boundary, the model accuracy is reported below.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037268&req=5

Figure 3: Dispersion of filled sommelier cards after rank normalization and transformation with PCA (Principal Component Analysis). Gray lines denote logistic regression decision boundary, the model accuracy is reported below.
Mentions: Figure 3 shows dispersion of wine descriptions after rank normalization and dimensionality reduction through PCA. We applied a simple multinomial logistic regression model to look for regularities in the data. The independent variables were top two principal components, the dependent variable was either wine label or experimental condition. We observe a clear difference between descriptions of individuals and pairs (accuracy 0.43 vs. accuracy 0.6), which means that those prepared by pairs are more discriminative.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Most of our perceptions of and engagements with the world are shaped by our immersion in social interactions, cultural traditions, tools and linguistic categories. In this study we experimentally investigate the impact of two types of language-based coordination on the recognition and description of complex sensory stimuli: that of red wine. Participants were asked to taste, remember and successively recognize samples of wines within a larger set in a two-by-two experimental design: (1) either individually or in pairs, and (2) with or without the support of a sommelier card—a cultural linguistic tool designed for wine description. Both effectiveness of recognition and the kinds of errors in the four conditions were analyzed. While our experimental manipulations did not impact recognition accuracy, bias-variance decomposition of error revealed non-trivial differences in how participants solved the task. Pairs generally displayed reduced bias and increased variance compared to individuals, however the variance dropped significantly when they used the sommelier card. The effect of sommelier card reducing the variance was observed only in pairs, individuals did not seem to benefit from the cultural linguistic tool. Analysis of descriptions generated with the aid of sommelier cards shows that pairs were more coherent and discriminative than individuals. The findings are discussed in terms of global properties and dynamics of collective systems when constrained by different types of cultural practices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus