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Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) for image-guided cancer surgery

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a novel molecular optical imaging technique based on the detection of optical Cerenkov photons emitted by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents. The ability to use clinically approved tumour-targeted tracers in combination with small-sized imaging equipment makes CLI a particularly interesting technique for image-guided cancer surgery. The past few years have witnessed a rapid increase in proof-of-concept preclinical studies in this field, and several clinical trials are currently underway. This article provides an overview of the basic principles of Cerenkov radiation and outlines the challenges of CLI-guided surgery for clinical use. The preclinical and clinical trial literature is examined including applications focussed on image-guided lymph node detection and Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy, and the ongoing clinical studies and technological developments are highlighted. By intraoperatively guiding the oncosurgeon towards more accurate and complete resections, CLI has the potential to transform current surgical practice, and improve oncological and cosmetic outcomes for patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A charged particle, in this case an electron, passing through a dielectric medium with a a particle speed (ν) lower than speed of light in that medium (c/η), b a particle speed larger than speed of light in that medium. The condition such that Cerenkov luminescence is produced along the particle’s track requires ν ≥ c/η
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Fig1: A charged particle, in this case an electron, passing through a dielectric medium with a a particle speed (ν) lower than speed of light in that medium (c/η), b a particle speed larger than speed of light in that medium. The condition such that Cerenkov luminescence is produced along the particle’s track requires ν ≥ c/η

Mentions: Cerenkov radiation is produced when a charged particle travels through a dielectric medium, i.e. a medium that can be polarised by an electric field, with a speed faster than the speed of light in that medium [24]. When propagating, the charged particle (a positively charged positron or negatively charged electron) induces a local polarisation by displacing the positive and negative charges of the atoms in the medium (Fig. 1). In a situation where the particle’s velocity does not exceed the speed of light in that medium, the polarisation field surrounding the particle is perfectly symmetrical, and there is no electric field at larger distances. The net result is that no Cerenkov radiation is emitted. When the particle’s speed exceeds the speed of light, however, the polarisation becomes asymmetrical along the track of the particle, resulting in a dipole electric field at larger distances from the particle. As the particle passes the electrons of the atoms return to their ground state, thereby emitting the transferred energy as optical photons that are known as Cerenkov radiation. Thus, Cerenkov radiation is produced as secondary emission; it is not the charged particle generating light, but the medium as a reaction to the particle.Fig. 1


Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) for image-guided cancer surgery
A charged particle, in this case an electron, passing through a dielectric medium with a a particle speed (ν) lower than speed of light in that medium (c/η), b a particle speed larger than speed of light in that medium. The condition such that Cerenkov luminescence is produced along the particle’s track requires ν ≥ c/η
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037157&req=5

Fig1: A charged particle, in this case an electron, passing through a dielectric medium with a a particle speed (ν) lower than speed of light in that medium (c/η), b a particle speed larger than speed of light in that medium. The condition such that Cerenkov luminescence is produced along the particle’s track requires ν ≥ c/η
Mentions: Cerenkov radiation is produced when a charged particle travels through a dielectric medium, i.e. a medium that can be polarised by an electric field, with a speed faster than the speed of light in that medium [24]. When propagating, the charged particle (a positively charged positron or negatively charged electron) induces a local polarisation by displacing the positive and negative charges of the atoms in the medium (Fig. 1). In a situation where the particle’s velocity does not exceed the speed of light in that medium, the polarisation field surrounding the particle is perfectly symmetrical, and there is no electric field at larger distances. The net result is that no Cerenkov radiation is emitted. When the particle’s speed exceeds the speed of light, however, the polarisation becomes asymmetrical along the track of the particle, resulting in a dipole electric field at larger distances from the particle. As the particle passes the electrons of the atoms return to their ground state, thereby emitting the transferred energy as optical photons that are known as Cerenkov radiation. Thus, Cerenkov radiation is produced as secondary emission; it is not the charged particle generating light, but the medium as a reaction to the particle.Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a novel molecular optical imaging technique based on the detection of optical Cerenkov photons emitted by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents. The ability to use clinically approved tumour-targeted tracers in combination with small-sized imaging equipment makes CLI a particularly interesting technique for image-guided cancer surgery. The past few years have witnessed a rapid increase in proof-of-concept preclinical studies in this field, and several clinical trials are currently underway. This article provides an overview of the basic principles of Cerenkov radiation and outlines the challenges of CLI-guided surgery for clinical use. The preclinical and clinical trial literature is examined including applications focussed on image-guided lymph node detection and Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy, and the ongoing clinical studies and technological developments are highlighted. By intraoperatively guiding the oncosurgeon towards more accurate and complete resections, CLI has the potential to transform current surgical practice, and improve oncological and cosmetic outcomes for patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus