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Analytical assessment of the intense heat load of whipping cream, coffee cream, and condensed milk at retail in Austria and Germany

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ABSTRACT

Time temperature integrators (TTIs) are useful tools in estimating the heat load applied on differently processed dairy products. The objective of this study was to analyze and assess three TTIs – lactulose, furosine, and acid-soluble β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) – in 70 high heated dairy products at retail in Austria and Germany comprising whipping cream, coffee cream/milk, and condensed milk products. While β-Lg was not appropriate to evaluate the heat load of these products, furosine and especially lactulose increased with rising intensity of heat treatment, and are appropriate to distinguish between several heating categories analyzed. Pasteurized (n = 8) and “heat treated” (n = 5) whipping cream samples showed lowest furosine (48 ± 14/ 45 ± 19 mg.100 g−1 protein) and low lactulose (29 ± 10/57 ± 28 mg.L−1) concentrations, followed by ESL whipping cream (n = 10), ESL coffee cream (n = 1), and UHT whipping cream (n = 10) (furosine = 72 ± 37/71/161 ± 30 mg.100 g−1 protein; lactulose = 56 ± 41/161/195 ± 39 mg.L−1), respectively. Sterilized condensed milk samples (n = 14) showed the highest concentrations of both TTIs and could be clearly separated from UHT treated samples (n = 5) (furosine = 491 ± 196/216 ± 46 mg.100 g−1 protein; lactulose = 1997 ± 658/409 ± 161 mg.L−1), whereas the so-called heat-treated samples (n = 9) had a heat load in between showing an extreme range of variation for both TTIs.

No MeSH data available.


β-Lg concentrations (mean values ± SD in mg.L−1) of differently processed whipping cream samples purchased from Austrian and German market. Data for pasteurized and ESL samples have been already reported recently (Boitz and Mayer 2015)
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Fig5: β-Lg concentrations (mean values ± SD in mg.L−1) of differently processed whipping cream samples purchased from Austrian and German market. Data for pasteurized and ESL samples have been already reported recently (Boitz and Mayer 2015)

Mentions: Referring to the acid whey proteins analyzed in group II samples, no β-Lg bands were visible due to excessive heat load, and consequently, no differences in the intensity of β-Lg banding patterns could be observed in these samples (Fig. 4b). Smearing lanes may be a result of concentrated products, although samples were diluted prior to analysis. However, as whipping cream samples could be differentiated by their distinct banding patterns (Fig. 4a), these and some selected samples of group II were analyzed for their accurate β-Lg contents with RP-HPLC. Results for whipping cream samples are shown in Fig. 5, whereas most of the selected samples of group II were below the limit of quantification (LOQ was 20 mg.L−1).Fig. 5


Analytical assessment of the intense heat load of whipping cream, coffee cream, and condensed milk at retail in Austria and Germany
β-Lg concentrations (mean values ± SD in mg.L−1) of differently processed whipping cream samples purchased from Austrian and German market. Data for pasteurized and ESL samples have been already reported recently (Boitz and Mayer 2015)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037155&req=5

Fig5: β-Lg concentrations (mean values ± SD in mg.L−1) of differently processed whipping cream samples purchased from Austrian and German market. Data for pasteurized and ESL samples have been already reported recently (Boitz and Mayer 2015)
Mentions: Referring to the acid whey proteins analyzed in group II samples, no β-Lg bands were visible due to excessive heat load, and consequently, no differences in the intensity of β-Lg banding patterns could be observed in these samples (Fig. 4b). Smearing lanes may be a result of concentrated products, although samples were diluted prior to analysis. However, as whipping cream samples could be differentiated by their distinct banding patterns (Fig. 4a), these and some selected samples of group II were analyzed for their accurate β-Lg contents with RP-HPLC. Results for whipping cream samples are shown in Fig. 5, whereas most of the selected samples of group II were below the limit of quantification (LOQ was 20 mg.L−1).Fig. 5

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Time temperature integrators (TTIs) are useful tools in estimating the heat load applied on differently processed dairy products. The objective of this study was to analyze and assess three TTIs – lactulose, furosine, and acid-soluble β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) – in 70 high heated dairy products at retail in Austria and Germany comprising whipping cream, coffee cream/milk, and condensed milk products. While β-Lg was not appropriate to evaluate the heat load of these products, furosine and especially lactulose increased with rising intensity of heat treatment, and are appropriate to distinguish between several heating categories analyzed. Pasteurized (n = 8) and “heat treated” (n = 5) whipping cream samples showed lowest furosine (48 ± 14/ 45 ± 19 mg.100 g−1 protein) and low lactulose (29 ± 10/57 ± 28 mg.L−1) concentrations, followed by ESL whipping cream (n = 10), ESL coffee cream (n = 1), and UHT whipping cream (n = 10) (furosine = 72 ± 37/71/161 ± 30 mg.100 g−1 protein; lactulose = 56 ± 41/161/195 ± 39 mg.L−1), respectively. Sterilized condensed milk samples (n = 14) showed the highest concentrations of both TTIs and could be clearly separated from UHT treated samples (n = 5) (furosine = 491 ± 196/216 ± 46 mg.100 g−1 protein; lactulose = 1997 ± 658/409 ± 161 mg.L−1), whereas the so-called heat-treated samples (n = 9) had a heat load in between showing an extreme range of variation for both TTIs.

No MeSH data available.