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Analytical assessment of the intense heat load of whipping cream, coffee cream, and condensed milk at retail in Austria and Germany

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Time temperature integrators (TTIs) are useful tools in estimating the heat load applied on differently processed dairy products. The objective of this study was to analyze and assess three TTIs – lactulose, furosine, and acid-soluble β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) – in 70 high heated dairy products at retail in Austria and Germany comprising whipping cream, coffee cream/milk, and condensed milk products. While β-Lg was not appropriate to evaluate the heat load of these products, furosine and especially lactulose increased with rising intensity of heat treatment, and are appropriate to distinguish between several heating categories analyzed. Pasteurized (n = 8) and “heat treated” (n = 5) whipping cream samples showed lowest furosine (48 ± 14/ 45 ± 19 mg.100 g−1 protein) and low lactulose (29 ± 10/57 ± 28 mg.L−1) concentrations, followed by ESL whipping cream (n = 10), ESL coffee cream (n = 1), and UHT whipping cream (n = 10) (furosine = 72 ± 37/71/161 ± 30 mg.100 g−1 protein; lactulose = 56 ± 41/161/195 ± 39 mg.L−1), respectively. Sterilized condensed milk samples (n = 14) showed the highest concentrations of both TTIs and could be clearly separated from UHT treated samples (n = 5) (furosine = 491 ± 196/216 ± 46 mg.100 g−1 protein; lactulose = 1997 ± 658/409 ± 161 mg.L−1), whereas the so-called heat-treated samples (n = 9) had a heat load in between showing an extreme range of variation for both TTIs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Classification of sample set according to their production technology, fat content, and applied heat treatment as well as chosen arrangement into “group I” and “group II” for data evaluation. “1x”– single flow heating; “2x”– second heating prior to filling
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Fig1: Classification of sample set according to their production technology, fat content, and applied heat treatment as well as chosen arrangement into “group I” and “group II” for data evaluation. “1x”– single flow heating; “2x”– second heating prior to filling

Mentions: After homogenization and adjustment of fat content, a heat treatment step is necessary to minimize microbial spoilage, inactivate pathogens, and to guarantee a certain shelf life of the product depending on the heat load applied. Table 1 compares processing conditions of pasteurized milk to those applied to various types of whipping cream and sterilized coffee cream/milk. While the label “ESL” for whipping cream is not commonly used in Germany, the label “heat treated” (“wärmebehandelt”) could be often found on whipping cream packaging indicating a second heating step using temperatures between 95 and 105 °C of whipping cream prior to filling (indicated with “2x” in Fig.1).Table 1


Analytical assessment of the intense heat load of whipping cream, coffee cream, and condensed milk at retail in Austria and Germany
Classification of sample set according to their production technology, fat content, and applied heat treatment as well as chosen arrangement into “group I” and “group II” for data evaluation. “1x”– single flow heating; “2x”– second heating prior to filling
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037155&req=5

Fig1: Classification of sample set according to their production technology, fat content, and applied heat treatment as well as chosen arrangement into “group I” and “group II” for data evaluation. “1x”– single flow heating; “2x”– second heating prior to filling
Mentions: After homogenization and adjustment of fat content, a heat treatment step is necessary to minimize microbial spoilage, inactivate pathogens, and to guarantee a certain shelf life of the product depending on the heat load applied. Table 1 compares processing conditions of pasteurized milk to those applied to various types of whipping cream and sterilized coffee cream/milk. While the label “ESL” for whipping cream is not commonly used in Germany, the label “heat treated” (“wärmebehandelt”) could be often found on whipping cream packaging indicating a second heating step using temperatures between 95 and 105 °C of whipping cream prior to filling (indicated with “2x” in Fig.1).Table 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Time temperature integrators (TTIs) are useful tools in estimating the heat load applied on differently processed dairy products. The objective of this study was to analyze and assess three TTIs – lactulose, furosine, and acid-soluble β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) – in 70 high heated dairy products at retail in Austria and Germany comprising whipping cream, coffee cream/milk, and condensed milk products. While β-Lg was not appropriate to evaluate the heat load of these products, furosine and especially lactulose increased with rising intensity of heat treatment, and are appropriate to distinguish between several heating categories analyzed. Pasteurized (n = 8) and “heat treated” (n = 5) whipping cream samples showed lowest furosine (48 ± 14/ 45 ± 19 mg.100 g−1 protein) and low lactulose (29 ± 10/57 ± 28 mg.L−1) concentrations, followed by ESL whipping cream (n = 10), ESL coffee cream (n = 1), and UHT whipping cream (n = 10) (furosine = 72 ± 37/71/161 ± 30 mg.100 g−1 protein; lactulose = 56 ± 41/161/195 ± 39 mg.L−1), respectively. Sterilized condensed milk samples (n = 14) showed the highest concentrations of both TTIs and could be clearly separated from UHT treated samples (n = 5) (furosine = 491 ± 196/216 ± 46 mg.100 g−1 protein; lactulose = 1997 ± 658/409 ± 161 mg.L−1), whereas the so-called heat-treated samples (n = 9) had a heat load in between showing an extreme range of variation for both TTIs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus