Limits...
Problem solving, impulse control and planning in patients with early- and late-stage Huntington ’ s disease

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Sub-domains of executive functions, including problems with planning, accuracy, impulsivity, and inhibition, are core features of Huntington’s disease. It is known that the decline of cognitive function in Huntington’s disease is related to the anatomical progression of pathology in the basal ganglia. However, it remains to be determined whether the severity of executive dysfunction depends on the stage of the disease. To examine the severity of sub-domains of executive dysfunction in early- and late-stage Huntington’s disease, we studied performance in the Tower of London task of two groups of Huntington’s disease patients (Group 1: early, n = 23, and Group 2: late stage, n = 29), as well as a third group of age, education, and IQ matched healthy controls (n = 34). During the task, we measured the total number of problems solved, total planning time, and total number of breaks taken. One aspect of executive function indexed by the number of solved problems seems to progress in the course of the disease. Late-stage Huntington’s disease patients scored significantly worse than early-stage patients and controls, and early-stage patients scored significantly worse than controls on this measure of accuracy. In contrast, late- and early-stage HD patients did not differ in terms of planning time and number of breaks. Early- and late-stage HD pathology has a different impact on executive sub-domains. While accuracy differs between early- and late-stage HD patients, other domains like planning time and number of breaks do not. Striatal degeneration, which is a characteristic feature of the disease, might not affect all aspects of executive function in HD.

No MeSH data available.


Number of breaks for three-, four-, five- and six-move problems, plotted separately for late-stage HD patients, early-stage HD patients and controls. Error bars represent standard errors. Asterisks indicate where the comparison between the groups was significant. *p < .05
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037143&req=5

Fig4: Number of breaks for three-, four-, five- and six-move problems, plotted separately for late-stage HD patients, early-stage HD patients and controls. Error bars represent standard errors. Asterisks indicate where the comparison between the groups was significant. *p < .05

Mentions: Figure 4 depicts the total number of breaks for three-, four-, five- and six-move problems of the ToL plotted separately for the two patient groups and for the three groups. To determine the effect of HD disease severity on number of breaks during the ToL task, an ANOVA was performed on number of breaks with Difficulty as a within-subjects variable and Group as a between-groups variable. This analysis revealed significantly main effects of Difficulty [F(3,249) = 27.36, p < .001] and Group [F(2) = 5.57, p = .005]. Furthermore, we calculated the total number of breaks across all the four difficulty conditions.Fig. 4


Problem solving, impulse control and planning in patients with early- and late-stage Huntington ’ s disease
Number of breaks for three-, four-, five- and six-move problems, plotted separately for late-stage HD patients, early-stage HD patients and controls. Error bars represent standard errors. Asterisks indicate where the comparison between the groups was significant. *p < .05
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037143&req=5

Fig4: Number of breaks for three-, four-, five- and six-move problems, plotted separately for late-stage HD patients, early-stage HD patients and controls. Error bars represent standard errors. Asterisks indicate where the comparison between the groups was significant. *p < .05
Mentions: Figure 4 depicts the total number of breaks for three-, four-, five- and six-move problems of the ToL plotted separately for the two patient groups and for the three groups. To determine the effect of HD disease severity on number of breaks during the ToL task, an ANOVA was performed on number of breaks with Difficulty as a within-subjects variable and Group as a between-groups variable. This analysis revealed significantly main effects of Difficulty [F(3,249) = 27.36, p < .001] and Group [F(2) = 5.57, p = .005]. Furthermore, we calculated the total number of breaks across all the four difficulty conditions.Fig. 4

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Sub-domains of executive functions, including problems with planning, accuracy, impulsivity, and inhibition, are core features of Huntington&rsquo;s disease. It is known that the decline of cognitive function in Huntington&rsquo;s disease is related to the anatomical progression of pathology in the basal ganglia. However, it remains to be determined whether the severity of executive dysfunction depends on the stage of the disease. To examine the severity of sub-domains of executive dysfunction in early- and late-stage Huntington&rsquo;s disease, we studied performance in the Tower of London task of two groups of Huntington&rsquo;s disease patients (Group 1: early, n&nbsp;=&nbsp;23, and Group 2: late stage, n&nbsp;=&nbsp;29), as well as a third group of age, education, and IQ matched healthy controls (n&nbsp;=&nbsp;34). During the task, we measured the total number of problems solved, total planning time, and total number of breaks taken. One aspect of executive function indexed by the number of solved problems seems to progress in the course of the disease. Late-stage Huntington&rsquo;s disease patients scored significantly worse than early-stage patients and controls, and early-stage patients scored significantly worse than controls on this measure of accuracy. In contrast, late- and early-stage HD patients did not differ in terms of planning time and number of breaks. Early- and late-stage HD pathology has a different impact on executive sub-domains. While accuracy differs between early- and late-stage HD patients, other domains like planning time and number of breaks do not. Striatal degeneration, which is a characteristic feature of the disease, might not affect all aspects of executive function in HD.

No MeSH data available.