Limits...
Misaligned and Polarity-Reversed Faces Determine Face-specific Capacity Limits

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ABSTRACT

Previous research using flanker paradigms suggests that peripheral distracter faces are automatically processed when participants have to classify a single central familiar target face. These distracter interference effects disappear when the central task contains additional anonymous (non-target) faces that load the search for the face target, but not when the central task contains additional non-face stimuli, suggesting there are face-specific capacity limits in visual processing. Here we tested whether manipulating the format of non-target faces in the search task affected face-specific capacity limits. Experiment 1 replicated earlier findings that a distracter face is processed even in high load conditions when participants looked for a target name of a famous person among additional names (non-targets) in a central search array. Two further experiments show that when targets and non-targets were faces (instead of names), however, distracter interference was eliminated under high load—adding non-target faces to the search array exhausted processing capacity for peripheral faces. The novel finding was that replacing non-target faces with images that consisted of two horizontally misaligned face-parts reduced distracter processing. Similar results were found when the polarity of a non-target face image was reversed. These results indicate that face-specific capacity limits are not determined by the configural properties of face processing, but by face parts.

No MeSH data available.


Mean reaction times in the name classification task of Experiment 1 as a function of set size and congruency. Error bars represent standard error of the mean.
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Figure 2: Mean reaction times in the name classification task of Experiment 1 as a function of set size and congruency. Error bars represent standard error of the mean.

Mentions: In the RTs there was a significant main effect of load, F(1, 15) = 336.3, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.95. RTs were faster under low load (M = 1197, SD = 140) compared to high load (M = 1488, SD = 158). The main effect of congruency was also significant, F(1, 15) = 8.42, p = 0.011, partial η2 = 0.36. RTs (see Figure 2) were faster on congruent trials (M = 1318, SD = 140) compared to incongruent trials (M = 1366, SD = 158). Importantly, there was no interaction between load and congruency, F(1, 15) = 0.5, p = 0.48, indicating that the congruency effect produced by the distracter faces remained unchanged as a function of load.


Misaligned and Polarity-Reversed Faces Determine Face-specific Capacity Limits
Mean reaction times in the name classification task of Experiment 1 as a function of set size and congruency. Error bars represent standard error of the mean.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037134&req=5

Figure 2: Mean reaction times in the name classification task of Experiment 1 as a function of set size and congruency. Error bars represent standard error of the mean.
Mentions: In the RTs there was a significant main effect of load, F(1, 15) = 336.3, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.95. RTs were faster under low load (M = 1197, SD = 140) compared to high load (M = 1488, SD = 158). The main effect of congruency was also significant, F(1, 15) = 8.42, p = 0.011, partial η2 = 0.36. RTs (see Figure 2) were faster on congruent trials (M = 1318, SD = 140) compared to incongruent trials (M = 1366, SD = 158). Importantly, there was no interaction between load and congruency, F(1, 15) = 0.5, p = 0.48, indicating that the congruency effect produced by the distracter faces remained unchanged as a function of load.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Previous research using flanker paradigms suggests that peripheral distracter faces are automatically processed when participants have to classify a single central familiar target face. These distracter interference effects disappear when the central task contains additional anonymous (non-target) faces that load the search for the face target, but not when the central task contains additional non-face stimuli, suggesting there are face-specific capacity limits in visual processing. Here we tested whether manipulating the format of non-target faces in the search task affected face-specific capacity limits. Experiment 1 replicated earlier findings that a distracter face is processed even in high load conditions when participants looked for a target name of a famous person among additional names (non-targets) in a central search array. Two further experiments show that when targets and non-targets were faces (instead of names), however, distracter interference was eliminated under high load&mdash;adding non-target faces to the search array exhausted processing capacity for peripheral faces. The novel finding was that replacing non-target faces with images that consisted of two horizontally misaligned face-parts reduced distracter processing. Similar results were found when the polarity of a non-target face image was reversed. These results indicate that face-specific capacity limits are not determined by the configural properties of face processing, but by face parts.

No MeSH data available.