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Coupling Bacterioplankton Populations and Environment to Community Function in Coastal Temperate Waters

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Bacterioplankton play a key role in marine waters facilitating processes important for carbon cycling. However, the influence of specific bacterial populations and environmental conditions on bacterioplankton community performance remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to identify drivers of bacterioplankton community functions, taking into account the variability in community composition and environmental conditions over seasons, in two contrasting coastal systems. A Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) analysis of the biological and chemical data obtained from surface waters over a full year indicated that specific bacterial populations were linked to measured functions. Namely, Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria) was strongly correlated with protease activity. Both function and community composition showed seasonal variation. However, the pattern of substrate utilization capacity could not be directly linked to the community dynamics. The overall importance of dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters in the LASSO models indicate that bacterioplankton respond to the present substrate landscape, with a particular importance of nitrogenous DOM. The identification of common drivers of bacterioplankton community functions in two different systems indicates that the drivers may be of broader relevance in coastal temperate waters.

No MeSH data available.


Seasonal variations in Chl a and the concentration of inorganic nutrients for Roskilde Fjord (A) and Great Belt (B). Note the separate y-axes for the inorganic nutrients in (A). Error bars represent standard error.
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Figure 2: Seasonal variations in Chl a and the concentration of inorganic nutrients for Roskilde Fjord (A) and Great Belt (B). Note the separate y-axes for the inorganic nutrients in (A). Error bars represent standard error.

Mentions: Several phytoplankton blooms occurred over the year in both systems (Figure 2), with the spring bloom from February to March and reaching maximum Chl a concentrations of 7.2 and 4.7 μg l-1 in RF and GB, respectively. In RF, Chl a increased again over the summer peaking in August (3.9 μg l-1), while GB experienced a bloom in October–November (3.6 μg l-1). The spring blooms caused large decreases in concentrations of inorganic nutrients in both systems, in particular inorganic nitrogen (Figure 2).


Coupling Bacterioplankton Populations and Environment to Community Function in Coastal Temperate Waters
Seasonal variations in Chl a and the concentration of inorganic nutrients for Roskilde Fjord (A) and Great Belt (B). Note the separate y-axes for the inorganic nutrients in (A). Error bars represent standard error.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037133&req=5

Figure 2: Seasonal variations in Chl a and the concentration of inorganic nutrients for Roskilde Fjord (A) and Great Belt (B). Note the separate y-axes for the inorganic nutrients in (A). Error bars represent standard error.
Mentions: Several phytoplankton blooms occurred over the year in both systems (Figure 2), with the spring bloom from February to March and reaching maximum Chl a concentrations of 7.2 and 4.7 μg l-1 in RF and GB, respectively. In RF, Chl a increased again over the summer peaking in August (3.9 μg l-1), while GB experienced a bloom in October–November (3.6 μg l-1). The spring blooms caused large decreases in concentrations of inorganic nutrients in both systems, in particular inorganic nitrogen (Figure 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Bacterioplankton play a key role in marine waters facilitating processes important for carbon cycling. However, the influence of specific bacterial populations and environmental conditions on bacterioplankton community performance remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to identify drivers of bacterioplankton community functions, taking into account the variability in community composition and environmental conditions over seasons, in two contrasting coastal systems. A Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) analysis of the biological and chemical data obtained from surface waters over a full year indicated that specific bacterial populations were linked to measured functions. Namely, Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria) was strongly correlated with protease activity. Both function and community composition showed seasonal variation. However, the pattern of substrate utilization capacity could not be directly linked to the community dynamics. The overall importance of dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters in the LASSO models indicate that bacterioplankton respond to the present substrate landscape, with a particular importance of nitrogenous DOM. The identification of common drivers of bacterioplankton community functions in two different systems indicates that the drivers may be of broader relevance in coastal temperate waters.

No MeSH data available.