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The biology and in vitro propagation of the ornamental aquatic plant, Aponogeton ulvaceus

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ABSTRACT

Aponogeton ulvaceus Baker (Aponogetonaceae) is a commercially important ornamental aquatic plant species with traditional medicinal uses. Due to the low survival rate of seedlings, propagation by conventional means has been met with many difficulties. In this study, botanical aspects of A. ulvaceus were examined with regards to the morphology, anatomy and physiology of the plant and an efficient protocol for its in vitro propagation using immature tuber explants has been established. The existence of glandular trichomes on the leaves was discovered and the occurrence of circumnutation in A. ulvaceus has been demonstrated. Immature tuber segments with meristems were cultured on MS medium supplemented with various combinations (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/L) of BAP and NAA for callus induction. The highest percentage of callus production (100 %) was obtained in two different treatments: 1 mg/L BAP and 3 mg/L NAA, and 2 mg/L BAP and 3 mg/L NAA. For shoot and root organogenesis, the combination of 1 mg/L BAP and 1 mg/L NAA was shown to be significant for A. ulvaceus regeneration when compared to control, which yields a mean shoot and root number of 22.50 and 29.50 respectively. The current protocol is the first reported successful establishment of in vitro clonal propagation of A. ulvaceus.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s40064-016-3041-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Indirect organogenesis from tuber-induced callus. a–c Developing yellowish green globular callus after 4 weeks. Callus formed on the edges of excised surface and proliferate on the entire surface of tubers; scale bars 0.5 cm. Note the purple colouration of callus in c. d Multiple shoot and root development from a single callus piece. Long shoots are trimmed to ease handling; scale bar 2 cm. e Multiple shoot apical meristems developing on callus; scale bar 0.8 cm. f An individual immature tuber with two shoots growing from the callus tissue; scale bar 0.6 cm. g–h Root development from callus tissue; scale bars 0.6 and 0.8 cm respectively
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Fig4: Indirect organogenesis from tuber-induced callus. a–c Developing yellowish green globular callus after 4 weeks. Callus formed on the edges of excised surface and proliferate on the entire surface of tubers; scale bars 0.5 cm. Note the purple colouration of callus in c. d Multiple shoot and root development from a single callus piece. Long shoots are trimmed to ease handling; scale bar 2 cm. e Multiple shoot apical meristems developing on callus; scale bar 0.8 cm. f An individual immature tuber with two shoots growing from the callus tissue; scale bar 0.6 cm. g–h Root development from callus tissue; scale bars 0.6 and 0.8 cm respectively

Mentions: Indirect organogenesis of A. ulvaceus under the influence of different concentrations of BAP and NAA was investigated. Results on callus induction and organogenesis using immature tuber tissues with meristems are shown in Table 1. Compact, yellowish green globular calli were formed after 4 weeks of incubation (Fig. 4a–c). Among the PGR combinations tested, T5 has yielded the highest number of shoots per explant (3.67) in day 28 (Table 1). However, after 8 weeks of incubation, shoot number of T3 culture increased up to 14.7-fold as compared to 28 days of growth with an overall highest mean shoot number (50.44). It is worth noting that longer exposure time of explants to BAP and NAA is critical for shoot regeneration and subsequent mass propagation as can be seen in the significant increase in % shoots and mean number of shoots in all the treatments compared to the control (Table 1).Table 1


The biology and in vitro propagation of the ornamental aquatic plant, Aponogeton ulvaceus
Indirect organogenesis from tuber-induced callus. a–c Developing yellowish green globular callus after 4 weeks. Callus formed on the edges of excised surface and proliferate on the entire surface of tubers; scale bars 0.5 cm. Note the purple colouration of callus in c. d Multiple shoot and root development from a single callus piece. Long shoots are trimmed to ease handling; scale bar 2 cm. e Multiple shoot apical meristems developing on callus; scale bar 0.8 cm. f An individual immature tuber with two shoots growing from the callus tissue; scale bar 0.6 cm. g–h Root development from callus tissue; scale bars 0.6 and 0.8 cm respectively
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037101&req=5

Fig4: Indirect organogenesis from tuber-induced callus. a–c Developing yellowish green globular callus after 4 weeks. Callus formed on the edges of excised surface and proliferate on the entire surface of tubers; scale bars 0.5 cm. Note the purple colouration of callus in c. d Multiple shoot and root development from a single callus piece. Long shoots are trimmed to ease handling; scale bar 2 cm. e Multiple shoot apical meristems developing on callus; scale bar 0.8 cm. f An individual immature tuber with two shoots growing from the callus tissue; scale bar 0.6 cm. g–h Root development from callus tissue; scale bars 0.6 and 0.8 cm respectively
Mentions: Indirect organogenesis of A. ulvaceus under the influence of different concentrations of BAP and NAA was investigated. Results on callus induction and organogenesis using immature tuber tissues with meristems are shown in Table 1. Compact, yellowish green globular calli were formed after 4 weeks of incubation (Fig. 4a–c). Among the PGR combinations tested, T5 has yielded the highest number of shoots per explant (3.67) in day 28 (Table 1). However, after 8 weeks of incubation, shoot number of T3 culture increased up to 14.7-fold as compared to 28 days of growth with an overall highest mean shoot number (50.44). It is worth noting that longer exposure time of explants to BAP and NAA is critical for shoot regeneration and subsequent mass propagation as can be seen in the significant increase in % shoots and mean number of shoots in all the treatments compared to the control (Table 1).Table 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aponogeton ulvaceus Baker (Aponogetonaceae) is a commercially important ornamental aquatic plant species with traditional medicinal uses. Due to the low survival rate of seedlings, propagation by conventional means has been met with many difficulties. In this study, botanical aspects of A. ulvaceus were examined with regards to the morphology, anatomy and physiology of the plant and an efficient protocol for its in vitro propagation using immature tuber explants has been established. The existence of glandular trichomes on the leaves was discovered and the occurrence of circumnutation in A. ulvaceus has been demonstrated. Immature tuber segments with meristems were cultured on MS medium supplemented with various combinations (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/L) of BAP and NAA for callus induction. The highest percentage of callus production (100 %) was obtained in two different treatments: 1 mg/L BAP and 3 mg/L NAA, and 2 mg/L BAP and 3 mg/L NAA. For shoot and root organogenesis, the combination of 1 mg/L BAP and 1 mg/L NAA was shown to be significant for A. ulvaceus regeneration when compared to control, which yields a mean shoot and root number of 22.50 and 29.50 respectively. The current protocol is the first reported successful establishment of in vitro clonal propagation of A. ulvaceus.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s40064-016-3041-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus