Limits...
How soil type (gypsum or limestone) influences the properties and composition of thyme honey

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: The objective of this work was to determine the influence of the soil substrate on the characteristics and properties of a specific type of honey. As such, we analysed the features of a typical single-flower honey, thyme honey, produced in a specific Mediterranean region. Thymus is a genus of aromatic perennial plants that are native to Europe, North Africa and Asia.

Methods: A total of 70 honey samples from hives situated on limestone (38 samples) or gypsum soils (32 samples) were studied. The physical and chemical properties of each samples were analyzed using standard assays.

Results: Within the same geographical area and despite a similar thyme pollen content, we observed variation in the physicochemical, antioxidant and sensorial characteristics of monofloral honeys. The quantification of certain physicochemical parameters of the honey indicated these features were influenced by the soil type. Indeed, the soil type of the hives’ settlement area, limestone or gypsum, influences the conductivity, antioxidant capacity, colour and floristic composition.

Conclusions: The present work demonstrates that soil type (gypsum or limestone) influences the characteristics of honey, potentially providing added market value to these products.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s40064-016-3243-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.


Climate mesomediterranean termothype, Mediterranean Region. Diagrams Bioclimatic models. Taken from Climate-Data.org. Information collected between 1982 and 2012
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037098&req=5

Fig2: Climate mesomediterranean termothype, Mediterranean Region. Diagrams Bioclimatic models. Taken from Climate-Data.org. Information collected between 1982 and 2012

Mentions: The dominant climate is identified as Meso-Mediterranean thermotype with a dry ombrotype (Aldeanueva et al. 1989; Papadakis 1966; Rivas-Martínez 2008). The variation in the annual average temperature between the areas of highest and lowest altitude is 1 °C and the difference in the annual precipitation is 100 mm. The territory suffers summer drought (Fig. 2).Fig. 2


How soil type (gypsum or limestone) influences the properties and composition of thyme honey
Climate mesomediterranean termothype, Mediterranean Region. Diagrams Bioclimatic models. Taken from Climate-Data.org. Information collected between 1982 and 2012
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037098&req=5

Fig2: Climate mesomediterranean termothype, Mediterranean Region. Diagrams Bioclimatic models. Taken from Climate-Data.org. Information collected between 1982 and 2012
Mentions: The dominant climate is identified as Meso-Mediterranean thermotype with a dry ombrotype (Aldeanueva et al. 1989; Papadakis 1966; Rivas-Martínez 2008). The variation in the annual average temperature between the areas of highest and lowest altitude is 1 °C and the difference in the annual precipitation is 100 mm. The territory suffers summer drought (Fig. 2).Fig. 2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: The objective of this work was to determine the influence of the soil substrate on the characteristics and properties of a specific type of honey. As such, we analysed the features of a typical single-flower honey, thyme honey, produced in a specific Mediterranean region. Thymus is a genus of aromatic perennial plants that are native to Europe, North Africa and Asia.

Methods: A total of 70 honey samples from hives situated on limestone (38 samples) or gypsum soils (32 samples) were studied. The physical and chemical properties of each samples were analyzed using standard assays.

Results: Within the same geographical area and despite a similar thyme pollen content, we observed variation in the physicochemical, antioxidant and sensorial characteristics of monofloral honeys. The quantification of certain physicochemical parameters of the honey indicated these features were influenced by the soil type. Indeed, the soil type of the hives’ settlement area, limestone or gypsum, influences the conductivity, antioxidant capacity, colour and floristic composition.

Conclusions: The present work demonstrates that soil type (gypsum or limestone) influences the characteristics of honey, potentially providing added market value to these products.

Electronic supplementary material: The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s40064-016-3243-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

No MeSH data available.