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Pregnancy and inflammatory bowel disease: Do we provide enough patient education? A British study of 1324 women

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ABSTRACT

Aim: To examine patient knowledge and factors influencing knowledge about pregnancy in British women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Methods: This is a post hoc analysis of a study of female members of Crohn’s and Colitis United Kingdom, aged 18-45 years who were sent an online questionnaire recording patient demographics, education, employment, marital status, and disease characteristics. Disease related pregnancy knowledge was recorded using Crohn’s and colitis pregnancy knowledge score (CCPKnow).

Results: Of 1324 responders, 776 (59%) suffered from Crohn’s disease, 496 (38%) from ulcerative colitis and 52 (4%) from IBD-uncategorised. CCPKnow scores were poor (0-7) in 50.8%, adequate (8-10) in 23.6%, good (11-13) in 17.7% and very good (≥ 14) in 7.8%. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that higher CCPKnow scores were independently associated with higher educational achievement (P < 0.001), younger age at diagnosis (P = 0.003) and having consulted a health care professional about pregnancy and IBD (P = 0.001).

Conclusion: Knowledge was poor in 50%. Speaking with health-care professionals was a modifiable factor associated with better knowledge. This illustrates the importance of disease related pregnancy education

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Demonstrates effect of talking to healthcare professionals on Crohn’s and colitis pregnancy knowledge scores.
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Figure 1: Demonstrates effect of talking to healthcare professionals on Crohn’s and colitis pregnancy knowledge scores.

Mentions: Speaking to health care professionals about IBD and pregnancy, was also associated with better CCPKnow scores (spoken to a healthcare professional 8.75 vs not 5.82, P < 0.001). This significant difference persisted even when data was divided into specific types of healthcare professionals. Thus, talking to any healthcare professional significantly correlated with higher knowledge (Gastroenterologist 9.18 vs no 6.25, P < 0.001), (GP 8.44 vs no 6.98, P < 0.001), (Specialist IBD nurse 9.27 vs 6.83, P < 0.001; see Figure 1).


Pregnancy and inflammatory bowel disease: Do we provide enough patient education? A British study of 1324 women
Demonstrates effect of talking to healthcare professionals on Crohn’s and colitis pregnancy knowledge scores.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037091&req=5

Figure 1: Demonstrates effect of talking to healthcare professionals on Crohn’s and colitis pregnancy knowledge scores.
Mentions: Speaking to health care professionals about IBD and pregnancy, was also associated with better CCPKnow scores (spoken to a healthcare professional 8.75 vs not 5.82, P < 0.001). This significant difference persisted even when data was divided into specific types of healthcare professionals. Thus, talking to any healthcare professional significantly correlated with higher knowledge (Gastroenterologist 9.18 vs no 6.25, P < 0.001), (GP 8.44 vs no 6.98, P < 0.001), (Specialist IBD nurse 9.27 vs 6.83, P < 0.001; see Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim: To examine patient knowledge and factors influencing knowledge about pregnancy in British women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Methods: This is a post hoc analysis of a study of female members of Crohn&rsquo;s and Colitis United Kingdom, aged 18-45 years who were sent an online questionnaire recording patient demographics, education, employment, marital status, and disease characteristics. Disease related pregnancy knowledge was recorded using Crohn&rsquo;s and colitis pregnancy knowledge score (CCPKnow).

Results: Of 1324 responders, 776 (59%) suffered from Crohn&rsquo;s disease, 496 (38%) from ulcerative colitis and 52 (4%) from IBD-uncategorised. CCPKnow scores were poor (0-7) in 50.8%, adequate (8-10) in 23.6%, good (11-13) in 17.7% and very good (&ge; 14) in 7.8%. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that higher CCPKnow scores were independently associated with higher educational achievement (P &lt; 0.001), younger age at diagnosis (P = 0.003) and having consulted a health care professional about pregnancy and IBD (P = 0.001).

Conclusion: Knowledge was poor in 50%. Speaking with health-care professionals was a modifiable factor associated with better knowledge. This illustrates the importance of disease related pregnancy education

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus