Limits...
FOCUS: Future of fecal calprotectin utility study in inflammatory bowel disease

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate the perspective of gastroenterologists regarding the impact of fecal calprotectin (FC) on the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Methods: Patients with known IBD or symptoms suggestive of IBD for whom the physician identified that FC would be clinically useful were recruited. Physicians completed an online “pre survey” outlining their rationale for the test. After receipt of the test results, the physicians completed an online “post survey” to portray their perceived impact of the test result on patient management. Clinical outcomes for a subset of patients with follow-up data available beyond the completion of the “post survey” were collected and analyzed.

Results: Of 373 test kits distributed, 290 were returned, resulting in 279 fully completed surveys. One hundred and ninety patients were known to have IBD; 147 (77%) with Crohn’s Disease, 43 (21%) Ulcerative Colitis and 5 (2%) IBD unclassified. Indications for FC testing included: 90 (32.2%) to differentiate a new diagnosis of IBD from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), 85 (30.5%) to distinguish symptoms of IBS from IBD in those known to have IBD and 104 (37.2%) as an objective measure of inflammation. FC levels resulted in a change in management 51.3% (143/279) of the time which included a significant reduction in the number of colonoscopies (118) performed (P < 0.001). Overall, 97.5% (272/279) of the time, the physicians found the test sufficiently useful that they would order it again in similar situations. Follow-up data was available for 172 patients with further support for the clinical utility of FC provided.

Conclusion: The FC test effected a change in management 51.3% of the time and receipt of the result was associated with a reduction in the number of colonoscopies performed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Outcomes of follow-up patient subset. Clinical outcomes in the follow-up subgroup according to FC result. FC: Fecal calprotectin; IBD: Inflammatory bowel disease.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037090&req=5

Figure 4: Outcomes of follow-up patient subset. Clinical outcomes in the follow-up subgroup according to FC result. FC: Fecal calprotectin; IBD: Inflammatory bowel disease.

Mentions: Medical record review was possible for 210 of the initial 373 patients recruited to the study. All of these patients had been recruited from an academic referral centre. For 172 of these 210 patients, FC testing and surveys were completed. (Figure 4) Of the remaining 38 patients who did not complete study FC testing, 31 patients were known to have IBD. Four of the 38 patients had endoscopic investigations instead at the discretion of the treating physician, while seven patients did not return for follow up after the initial recommendation for FC testing.


FOCUS: Future of fecal calprotectin utility study in inflammatory bowel disease
Outcomes of follow-up patient subset. Clinical outcomes in the follow-up subgroup according to FC result. FC: Fecal calprotectin; IBD: Inflammatory bowel disease.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037090&req=5

Figure 4: Outcomes of follow-up patient subset. Clinical outcomes in the follow-up subgroup according to FC result. FC: Fecal calprotectin; IBD: Inflammatory bowel disease.
Mentions: Medical record review was possible for 210 of the initial 373 patients recruited to the study. All of these patients had been recruited from an academic referral centre. For 172 of these 210 patients, FC testing and surveys were completed. (Figure 4) Of the remaining 38 patients who did not complete study FC testing, 31 patients were known to have IBD. Four of the 38 patients had endoscopic investigations instead at the discretion of the treating physician, while seven patients did not return for follow up after the initial recommendation for FC testing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate the perspective of gastroenterologists regarding the impact of fecal calprotectin (FC) on the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Methods: Patients with known IBD or symptoms suggestive of IBD for whom the physician identified that FC would be clinically useful were recruited. Physicians completed an online “pre survey” outlining their rationale for the test. After receipt of the test results, the physicians completed an online “post survey” to portray their perceived impact of the test result on patient management. Clinical outcomes for a subset of patients with follow-up data available beyond the completion of the “post survey” were collected and analyzed.

Results: Of 373 test kits distributed, 290 were returned, resulting in 279 fully completed surveys. One hundred and ninety patients were known to have IBD; 147 (77%) with Crohn’s Disease, 43 (21%) Ulcerative Colitis and 5 (2%) IBD unclassified. Indications for FC testing included: 90 (32.2%) to differentiate a new diagnosis of IBD from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), 85 (30.5%) to distinguish symptoms of IBS from IBD in those known to have IBD and 104 (37.2%) as an objective measure of inflammation. FC levels resulted in a change in management 51.3% (143/279) of the time which included a significant reduction in the number of colonoscopies (118) performed (P < 0.001). Overall, 97.5% (272/279) of the time, the physicians found the test sufficiently useful that they would order it again in similar situations. Follow-up data was available for 172 patients with further support for the clinical utility of FC provided.

Conclusion: The FC test effected a change in management 51.3% of the time and receipt of the result was associated with a reduction in the number of colonoscopies performed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus