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Epidemiology of hepatitis C in Greece

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ABSTRACT

Hepatitis C is a global health issue and constitutes a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. In this article, a comprehensive literature search was conducted for the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Greece, since data on the HCV prevalence, viremia and genotypes are important for developing strategies to manage or eliminate HCV infection. In addition, the pattern of HCV infection was analyzed according to the geographic region and the risk factors. These differences reflect not only distinct epidemiological characteristics among populations, but also differences on the strategy of data acquisition and quantification. Although there are not enough data, the estimation of the current prevalence of Hepatitis C in Greece ranges from 0.5% to 2%. The most important risk factors for HCV infection include blood product transfusion, intravenous drug use, chronic hemodialysis, organ transplantation, occupational exposure, sexual transmission, and vertical transmission. Because of lack of vaccine or effective post-exposure prophylaxis for HCV, the main focus of prevention is to recognize and control these risk factors. HCV infection in Greece is closely associated with the development of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. As far as the genotype distribution is concerned genotype 1 estimated to be 45%-47% and it constitutes the prevalent genotype in Greece, followed by genotype 3.

No MeSH data available.


Genotype distribution in the Greek population.
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Figure 1: Genotype distribution in the Greek population.

Mentions: Genotypes 1a, 1b, 3a and 4a appeared in the Greek population around 1965, 1958, 1975 and 1967 respectively[29]. In addition, it is mentioned that during 1978-1990 genotype 3 increased rapidly, whereas the other subtypes increased slowly during 1960-1990[29,68]. Recent studies demonstrate genotype distribution in Greece. According to many studies, genotype 1 is estimated to be 45%-47% and it constitutes the prevalent genotype in Greece, followed by genotype 3[4,11,68]. The incidence of the remainder genotypes is genotype 4 (13%), genotype 2 (9%), genotype 5 (1.2%) and genotype 6 (0%)[4,11,69] (Figure 1). As far as subtypes are concerned, the most prevalent is 3a (32.9%), followed by 1b (26.8%) and 2a (6.1%).


Epidemiology of hepatitis C in Greece
Genotype distribution in the Greek population.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5037078&req=5

Figure 1: Genotype distribution in the Greek population.
Mentions: Genotypes 1a, 1b, 3a and 4a appeared in the Greek population around 1965, 1958, 1975 and 1967 respectively[29]. In addition, it is mentioned that during 1978-1990 genotype 3 increased rapidly, whereas the other subtypes increased slowly during 1960-1990[29,68]. Recent studies demonstrate genotype distribution in Greece. According to many studies, genotype 1 is estimated to be 45%-47% and it constitutes the prevalent genotype in Greece, followed by genotype 3[4,11,68]. The incidence of the remainder genotypes is genotype 4 (13%), genotype 2 (9%), genotype 5 (1.2%) and genotype 6 (0%)[4,11,69] (Figure 1). As far as subtypes are concerned, the most prevalent is 3a (32.9%), followed by 1b (26.8%) and 2a (6.1%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Hepatitis C is a global health issue and constitutes a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. In this article, a comprehensive literature search was conducted for the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Greece, since data on the HCV prevalence, viremia and genotypes are important for developing strategies to manage or eliminate HCV infection. In addition, the pattern of HCV infection was analyzed according to the geographic region and the risk factors. These differences reflect not only distinct epidemiological characteristics among populations, but also differences on the strategy of data acquisition and quantification. Although there are not enough data, the estimation of the current prevalence of Hepatitis C in Greece ranges from 0.5% to 2%. The most important risk factors for HCV infection include blood product transfusion, intravenous drug use, chronic hemodialysis, organ transplantation, occupational exposure, sexual transmission, and vertical transmission. Because of lack of vaccine or effective post-exposure prophylaxis for HCV, the main focus of prevention is to recognize and control these risk factors. HCV infection in Greece is closely associated with the development of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. As far as the genotype distribution is concerned genotype 1 estimated to be 45%-47% and it constitutes the prevalent genotype in Greece, followed by genotype 3.

No MeSH data available.