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Design of Distributed Engine Control Systems with Uncertain Delay

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ABSTRACT

Future gas turbine engine control systems will be based on distributed architecture, in which, the sensors and actuators will be connected to the controllers via a communication network. The performance of the distributed engine control (DEC) is dependent on the network performance. This study introduces a distributed control system architecture based on a networked cascade control system (NCCS). Typical turboshaft engine-distributed controllers are designed based on the NCCS framework with a H∞ output feedback under network-induced time delays and uncertain disturbances. The sufficient conditions for robust stability are derived via the Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality approach. Both numerical and hardware-in-loop simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the presented method.

No MeSH data available.


Block diagram of the NCCS model.
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pone.0163545.g002: Block diagram of the NCCS model.

Mentions: Control laws essentially work to maintain the power turbine speed, NP, constant at the set point by modulating the fuel flow, WF. The control accomplishes this by scheduling a nominal NG speed as a function of the XCPC, T1 and P1. The control trims this NG demand to isochronously adjust NP to the NP set input. The power lever angle (PLA) position limits the maximum permissible NG, while the control further limits the maximum T45. The control limits the NG acceleration/deceleration rate as a function of an NG scheduled WF/PS3 limit. The DEC discussed herein has one network, which is inserted in the gas generator controller and the gas generator. Fig 2 shows the architecture. The abovementioned description illustrates that the GE T700 control structure is a cascade control structure, wherein the desired primary process output can only be controlled by controlling the secondary control process output.


Design of Distributed Engine Control Systems with Uncertain Delay
Block diagram of the NCCS model.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036803&req=5

pone.0163545.g002: Block diagram of the NCCS model.
Mentions: Control laws essentially work to maintain the power turbine speed, NP, constant at the set point by modulating the fuel flow, WF. The control accomplishes this by scheduling a nominal NG speed as a function of the XCPC, T1 and P1. The control trims this NG demand to isochronously adjust NP to the NP set input. The power lever angle (PLA) position limits the maximum permissible NG, while the control further limits the maximum T45. The control limits the NG acceleration/deceleration rate as a function of an NG scheduled WF/PS3 limit. The DEC discussed herein has one network, which is inserted in the gas generator controller and the gas generator. Fig 2 shows the architecture. The abovementioned description illustrates that the GE T700 control structure is a cascade control structure, wherein the desired primary process output can only be controlled by controlling the secondary control process output.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Future gas turbine engine control systems will be based on distributed architecture, in which, the sensors and actuators will be connected to the controllers via a communication network. The performance of the distributed engine control (DEC) is dependent on the network performance. This study introduces a distributed control system architecture based on a networked cascade control system (NCCS). Typical turboshaft engine-distributed controllers are designed based on the NCCS framework with a H∞ output feedback under network-induced time delays and uncertain disturbances. The sufficient conditions for robust stability are derived via the Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality approach. Both numerical and hardware-in-loop simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the presented method.

No MeSH data available.