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Acoustic, Visual and Spatial Indicators for the Description of the Soundscape of Waterfront Areas with and without Road Traffic Flow

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ABSTRACT

High flows of road traffic noise in urban agglomerations can negatively affect the livability of squares and parks located at the neighborhood, district and city levels, therefore pushing anyone who wants to enjoy calmer, quieter areas to move to non-urban parks. Due to the distances between these areas, it is not possible to go as regularly as would be necessary to satisfy any needs. Even if cities are densely populated, the presence of a sea or riverfront offers the possibility of large restorative places, or at least with potential features for being the natural core of an urban nucleus after a renewal intervention. This study evaluates the soundscape of the Naples waterfront, presenting an overview of the most significant visual, acoustic and spatial factors related to the pedestrian areas, as well as areas open to road traffic and others where the road traffic is limited. The factors were chosen with feature selection methods and artificial neural networks. The results show how certain factors, such as the perimeter between the water and promenade, the visibility of the sea or the density of green areas, can affect the perception of the soundscape quality in the areas with road traffic. In the pedestrian areas, acoustic factors, such as loudness or the A-weighted sound level exceeded for 10% of the measurement duration (LA10), influence the perceived quality of the soundscape.

No MeSH data available.


Examples of the panoramic photographs from which the class percentages were calculated.
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ijerph-13-00934-f002: Examples of the panoramic photographs from which the class percentages were calculated.

Mentions: Acoustic, visual and perceptual data, collected during two field surveys conducted in winter and summer 2014 along the Naples seafront (see areas under study in Figure 2), were used. Face to face interviews were carried out on weekdays and weekends from 10:00 h to 17:00 h. The three groups of areas have a homogeneous distribution of participants, from a total of 254 randomly selected interviewees (limited traffic areas: 33%, open to road traffic areas; 24%, pedestrian areas: 41.3%). Among them, 27.7% were tourists (34.6% from South Italy, 36.5% from North Italy and from other countries: South Europe 9.6%, North Europe 17.3%, South America 1.9%). Age, gender and occupation were distributed in the sample as shown in Table 1. More information on the methodology and data acquired can be found in [4,36]. All the data used in this study comes from on-site interviews and the post processing of sound recordings, 360° photographs and aerial photographs.


Acoustic, Visual and Spatial Indicators for the Description of the Soundscape of Waterfront Areas with and without Road Traffic Flow
Examples of the panoramic photographs from which the class percentages were calculated.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036766&req=5

ijerph-13-00934-f002: Examples of the panoramic photographs from which the class percentages were calculated.
Mentions: Acoustic, visual and perceptual data, collected during two field surveys conducted in winter and summer 2014 along the Naples seafront (see areas under study in Figure 2), were used. Face to face interviews were carried out on weekdays and weekends from 10:00 h to 17:00 h. The three groups of areas have a homogeneous distribution of participants, from a total of 254 randomly selected interviewees (limited traffic areas: 33%, open to road traffic areas; 24%, pedestrian areas: 41.3%). Among them, 27.7% were tourists (34.6% from South Italy, 36.5% from North Italy and from other countries: South Europe 9.6%, North Europe 17.3%, South America 1.9%). Age, gender and occupation were distributed in the sample as shown in Table 1. More information on the methodology and data acquired can be found in [4,36]. All the data used in this study comes from on-site interviews and the post processing of sound recordings, 360° photographs and aerial photographs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

High flows of road traffic noise in urban agglomerations can negatively affect the livability of squares and parks located at the neighborhood, district and city levels, therefore pushing anyone who wants to enjoy calmer, quieter areas to move to non-urban parks. Due to the distances between these areas, it is not possible to go as regularly as would be necessary to satisfy any needs. Even if cities are densely populated, the presence of a sea or riverfront offers the possibility of large restorative places, or at least with potential features for being the natural core of an urban nucleus after a renewal intervention. This study evaluates the soundscape of the Naples waterfront, presenting an overview of the most significant visual, acoustic and spatial factors related to the pedestrian areas, as well as areas open to road traffic and others where the road traffic is limited. The factors were chosen with feature selection methods and artificial neural networks. The results show how certain factors, such as the perimeter between the water and promenade, the visibility of the sea or the density of green areas, can affect the perception of the soundscape quality in the areas with road traffic. In the pedestrian areas, acoustic factors, such as loudness or the A-weighted sound level exceeded for 10% of the measurement duration (LA10), influence the perceived quality of the soundscape.

No MeSH data available.