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Using Fenton Oxidation to Simultaneously Remove Different Estrogens from Cow Manure

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The presence of estrogens in livestock excrement has raised concerns about their potential negative influence on animals and the overall food cycle. This is the first investigation to simultaneously remove estrogens, including estriol (E3), bisphenol A (BPA), diethylstilbestrol (DES), estradiol (E2), and ethinyl estradiol (EE2), from cow manure using a Fenton oxidation technique. Based on the residual concentrations and removal efficiency of estrogens, the Fenton oxidation reaction conditions were optimized as follows: a H2O2 dosage of 2.56 mmol/g, a Fe(II) to H2O2 molar ratio of 0.125 M/M, a solid to water mass ratio of 2 g/mL, an initial pH of 3, and a reaction time of 24 h. Under these conditions, the simultaneous removal efficiencies of E3, BPA, DES, E2, and EE2, with initial concentrations in cow manure of 97.40, 96.54, 100.22, 95.01, and 72.49 mg/kg, were 84.9%, 99.5%, 99.1%, 97.8%, and 84.5%, respectively. We clarified the possible Fenton oxidation reaction mechanisms that governed the degradation of estrogens. We concluded that Fenton oxidation technique could be effective for efficient removal of estrogens in livestock excrement. Results are of great importance for cow manure reuse in agricultural management, and can be used to reduce the threat of environmental estrogens to human health and ecological safety.

No MeSH data available.


Effect of initial pH values on the removal efficiency of estrogens from cow manure by the Fenton oxidation process. Note: Fe(II) to H2O2 molar ratio = 0.10 M/M; H2O2 dosage = 2.56 mmol/g; solid to water mass ratio = 2 g/mL; reaction time = 24 h. Error bars are standard deviations.
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ijerph-13-00917-f004: Effect of initial pH values on the removal efficiency of estrogens from cow manure by the Fenton oxidation process. Note: Fe(II) to H2O2 molar ratio = 0.10 M/M; H2O2 dosage = 2.56 mmol/g; solid to water mass ratio = 2 g/mL; reaction time = 24 h. Error bars are standard deviations.

Mentions: The initial pH values of the cow manure-water sludge significantly influenced the removal of the five tested estrogens by the Fenton oxidation process. As displayed in Table 5 and Figure 4, the residual concentrations of estrogens in cow manure were clearly enhanced, while the removal efficiency decreased as the initial pH values increased from 3 to 11.0, because pH can influence the generation of the HO· radical. When pH values decreased from 11.0 to 3.0, the removal efficiencies of E3, BPA, DES, E2, and EE2 increased from 37.4%, 98.2%, 91.1%, 90.8%, and 70.9% to 83.2%, 99.4%, 99.3%, 98.5%, and 84.1%, respectively. For BPA, DES, and E2, their removal efficiencies at test pH values were always >90%, while the removal efficiencies of E3 and EE2 were much smaller (always <84.08%).


Using Fenton Oxidation to Simultaneously Remove Different Estrogens from Cow Manure
Effect of initial pH values on the removal efficiency of estrogens from cow manure by the Fenton oxidation process. Note: Fe(II) to H2O2 molar ratio = 0.10 M/M; H2O2 dosage = 2.56 mmol/g; solid to water mass ratio = 2 g/mL; reaction time = 24 h. Error bars are standard deviations.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC5036750&req=5

ijerph-13-00917-f004: Effect of initial pH values on the removal efficiency of estrogens from cow manure by the Fenton oxidation process. Note: Fe(II) to H2O2 molar ratio = 0.10 M/M; H2O2 dosage = 2.56 mmol/g; solid to water mass ratio = 2 g/mL; reaction time = 24 h. Error bars are standard deviations.
Mentions: The initial pH values of the cow manure-water sludge significantly influenced the removal of the five tested estrogens by the Fenton oxidation process. As displayed in Table 5 and Figure 4, the residual concentrations of estrogens in cow manure were clearly enhanced, while the removal efficiency decreased as the initial pH values increased from 3 to 11.0, because pH can influence the generation of the HO· radical. When pH values decreased from 11.0 to 3.0, the removal efficiencies of E3, BPA, DES, E2, and EE2 increased from 37.4%, 98.2%, 91.1%, 90.8%, and 70.9% to 83.2%, 99.4%, 99.3%, 98.5%, and 84.1%, respectively. For BPA, DES, and E2, their removal efficiencies at test pH values were always >90%, while the removal efficiencies of E3 and EE2 were much smaller (always <84.08%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The presence of estrogens in livestock excrement has raised concerns about their potential negative influence on animals and the overall food cycle. This is the first investigation to simultaneously remove estrogens, including estriol (E3), bisphenol A (BPA), diethylstilbestrol (DES), estradiol (E2), and ethinyl estradiol (EE2), from cow manure using a Fenton oxidation technique. Based on the residual concentrations and removal efficiency of estrogens, the Fenton oxidation reaction conditions were optimized as follows: a H2O2 dosage of 2.56 mmol/g, a Fe(II) to H2O2 molar ratio of 0.125 M/M, a solid to water mass ratio of 2 g/mL, an initial pH of 3, and a reaction time of 24 h. Under these conditions, the simultaneous removal efficiencies of E3, BPA, DES, E2, and EE2, with initial concentrations in cow manure of 97.40, 96.54, 100.22, 95.01, and 72.49 mg/kg, were 84.9%, 99.5%, 99.1%, 97.8%, and 84.5%, respectively. We clarified the possible Fenton oxidation reaction mechanisms that governed the degradation of estrogens. We concluded that Fenton oxidation technique could be effective for efficient removal of estrogens in livestock excrement. Results are of great importance for cow manure reuse in agricultural management, and can be used to reduce the threat of environmental estrogens to human health and ecological safety.

No MeSH data available.